Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the president of the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial of San Francisco"

m. 



m 



^rnni' 







DOCUMENTS 



MAIN LIBRARY 




riOSED 

ACKS 



SAN FRAMCiSCO ^ J--^ 



39 y 



352 Sa528a — / 



663441 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 
FORM 3427 5000 9- 51 



:H 



r 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03373 1994 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualrepofpr19391946wa 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1939 



--.w LIBRAE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



WAR MEMORIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



December 21, ig^g 



GG3441 



3 1223 03373 1994 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Angelo J. Rossi 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 

Ralph J. A. Stern, President 

Horace B. Clifton, Vice President 

Judge Thomas M. Foley 

Frederick J. Koster 

Harry A. Milton 

Ramsay Moran 

Allison E. Schofield 

John J. Sullivan 

J. H. Threlkeld 

Colonel William H. Tobin 

Dr. Alanson Weeks 



War Memorial Staff 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director 
W. C. Douglas, Secretary to the Board 



To His Honor, the Mayor of San Francisco, 
AND TO This Board: 

Today is the final meeting of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial of San Francisco and for the year 1939, and, according 
to custom, I submit my concluding report as President of the 
Board. 

I am deeply indebted to the members of the Board, to our 
Managing Director, and to our Secretary, for the splendid sup^ 
port given me during the year. The proper administration of 
these great Temples of Service requires understanding as to their 
purpose, intelligent interest in its fulfillment, and constant 
thought and effort for accomplishment. Dedicated as they are 
to the Citi2;ens of San Francisco who gave their lives in the serv 
ice of our Country, their purpose is service to the living — and as 
such are unique among the War Memorials of this Country, pro' 
viding a home and meeting place for War Veteran organiziations, 
as well as artistic, cultural and spiritual opportunities for all 
the people of San Francisco. 

I have had a happy and pleasant year as your President. It has 
truly been a labor of love, and I am grateful for the privilege you 
afforded me and for the fine spirit and harmony that prevailed. 

My report follows: 
IN MEMORIAM 

The death of Vice President Clifton, in October, 1939, left a 
void that will be difficult to fill, and the following resolution was 
spread on the minutes of the Board: 

Whereas: On October 25, 1939, Almighty God, in His 
Infinite Wisdom, called to everlasting rest our beloved 
friend and Vice President, Horace Bradford Clifton; 
and 

Whereas: In his passing the community has lost an honest 
and upright business man, a conscientious public servant, a 
2,ealous patriot and loyal citizen, a patron of the Arts, a 
humane and kindly man highly esteemed by all who knew 
him. 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved: That we, the mem' 
bers of the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial of San 



Francisco, with whom he served so well, feeling a keen sense 
of personal loss in his death, express our deep erief, and 
extend to the bereaved widow and family our heartfelt 
sympathy; 

Further Resolved: That when this meeting adjourns, it 
adjourns out of respect to the memory of Horace Bradford 
Clifton; and 

Further Resolved: That a copy of this resolution be 
spread upon the minutes of this meeting and a copy for' 
warded to his wife, Olga Caroline Clifton. 



COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS FOR THE YEAR 1939 



Budget and Finance: Chairman 

(Including Panama Pa- Vicc-Chaii 

cific International Expo' Members 
sit ion Fellowship) 



Art Association: 



Chairman 

Members 



Opera and Symphony: Chairman 
Members 



Public Relations: 



P. P. I. E. Murals: 



Ve 



ETERANS 



W. P. A. Mural 
Project: 

Allocation of 
Earned Income: 

Traffic: 



Chairman 
Member 

Chairman 
Member 

Chairman 
Members 



Chairman 

Chairman 

Chiiirman 
[6] 



Trustee Moran 
lan Trustee Schofield 
Trustee Milton 
Trustee Threlkeld 
Trustee Weeks 

Trustee Koster 
Trustee Threlkeld 
Trustee Weeks 

Vice'President Clifton 
Trustee Koster 
Trustee Schoficld 
Trustee Threlkeld 

Trustee Foley 
Trustee Milton 

Trustee Col. Tobin 
\^ice President Clifton 

Trustee Schoficld 
Trustee Foley 
Trustee Moran 
Trustee Sullivan 
Trustee Col. Tobin 

Trustee Threlkeld 

Trustee Sullivan 
Trustee Schofield 



Because of illness, the services of Trustee Harry Milton and 
Trustee John Threlkeld were not available to the Board except 
during the early part of the year. 

Likewise, the services of Trustee John J. Sullivan were lost to 
the Board because of a provision in the Charter of the City and 
County of San Francisco which vacated his office at the time he 
filed as a candidate for Supervisor. 

A great portion of the Board's work is accomplished through 
committees and, because of their nature, the following committees 
bore the brunt of a large portion of the Board's activities: 

Budget and Finance Trustee Ramsay Moran, Chairman 
Veterans Trustee Allison Schofield, Chairman 

Opera AND Symphony Vice-President Horace Chfton, Chairman 

These Trustees, through their conscientious attention and effort, 
close application and understanding of their responsibilities, con- 
tributed outstanding effort to the success of this Board's opera- 
tions during the past year. They were constantly called on to 
solve problems that required their steady and active interest. They 
gave unstintingly of their time and have my deep admiration 
for their unselfish labors. My personal appreciation and thanks i- 
extended to them. 

The Board of Trustees has been operating as a unit with the 
happy disappearance of so-called ''Board classifications." No 
longer are the members of the Board recogni2;ed as "Opera Mem- 
bers" or "Symphony Members" or "Veteran Members" etc. They 
are now working as a body with full responsibilities to all the 
statutory tenants of the buildings. 

This condition is indeed gratifying, as it tends to a harmonious 
and efficient operation of the War Memorial as a whole. 

RELATIONS WITH TENANTS 

Harmony between the tenants and the Board during the past 
year has been all that could be desired. My personal appreciation 
is extended to Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley, Director of the San 

[7] 




[8] 



Francisco Museum of Art; to Dr. John J. O'Brien and Claude A. 
Marckley, Chairmen of the American Legion War Memorial 
Commission; to Robert W. Miller, President of the San Francisco 
Opera Association; to Mrs. Stanley Powell, President of the San 
Francisco Opera Guild; and to Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
President of the Musical Association of San Francisco,- — for their 
cooperation and appreciation of the problems involved in the 
operation of the War Memorial. 

Also in this regard, I would call your attention to the friendly, 
impartial service rendered to me personally, and to the Board as a 
whole, by the Secretary of the American Legion War Memorial 
Commission, Mr. Joseph C. Claridge. His suggestions and com' 
ments proved of inestimable value throughout the year. 

LABOR RELATIONS 

The relation between the Trustees and the employees of the 
War Memorial has been, on the whole, satisfactory — particularly 
with the heads of departments. Some difficulty had been en' 
countered with the janitorial staff through LInion demands con' 
cerning overtime. The very nature of the operation of the War 
Memorial requires constant janitorial service on practically a 
twenty-four hour schedule so that the normal hours of work are 
impossible to maintain and it was necessary, because of the ex' 
pense involved, to curtail our compensation for certain overtime 
work which caused some disruption and conference with Union 
officials. 

The Board maintained its position, and beheves that the new 
scheme of operation is proving to be satisfactory to a great ma- 
jority of the janitorial staff and we look forward to a continuance 
of our present harmonious relations. 

During the peak convention periods of this year, and also 
during the Grand Opera Season, our employees showed a par' 
ticularly fine appreciation of their obligation to the public. Their 
work was conscientiously and well done, and your President 
had the happy opportunity of complimenting most of our staff 
for their excellent work. 

[9} 



ACHIEVEMENTS 

Follows a progress report of some of the outstanding aehic\'ements 
accomplished during the year 1939. 

WAR MEMORIAL RESERVE FUND 

This tund was created by Ordinance 125, Series of 1939 of the 
Board of Supervisors allocating 15', of the gross revenue of the 
Department as a Reserve Fund, to be used for improvements, 
betterments and replacements within the Department. Up until 
the passage of this Ordinance and since the exhaustion of the trust 
fund account, the Board has been entirely dependent on appro' 
priations in the annual budget tor improvements and betterments. 
This was a very unsatisfactory situation because under the budget 
system the Board could never be sure that the items requested 
would be allowed and much needed work, for this reason, had to 
be postponed from year to year. 

Through the concentrated efforts of the members of the Board, 
this Ordinance, which received the approval of Mayor Angelo 
Rossi, the Chief Administrative Officer, and the Board of Super' 
visors, became a part of the statutes of the City and County of 
San Francisco, assuring, for the future, that the War Memorial 
will have a reserve fund on which to draw for its improvements 
and betterments as required. 

While this sum, under present earnings, will not be coiit 
pletely adequate for the purpose, it is a start in the right direc 
tion and gives a permanency to planning that would not be 
possible otherwise. 



MRS. FLOOD'S GIFT 

The War Memorial, and particularly the Opera House with its 
glorious foyers and corridors, could display and should be the 
home of fine works of art, and we were very happy to announce 
that Mrs. James L. Flood gave to the citizens of the City and 
County of San Francisco, for use in the Opera House, a mag' 
nificent collection of art objects, tapestries, mirrors, furniture, and 

[ HO 



statuary at an appraised value of over a quarter of a million dol- 
lars. These were placed in the Opera House and have added 
greatly to the color and warmth of the interior of the building. 
It is my sincere hope that other citizens of San Francisco will 
emulate Mrs. Flood's actions and donate, in the future, objects of 
art for the glorification of the buildings. 

HARD OF HEARING AIDS 

The electrical circuits in the Opera House for connection with 
head sets for the hard of hearing were placed in operation this 
year and have found ready acceptance — so much so that addi' 
tional facilities are now being developed. Outlets are located in 
the Orchestra section, Grand Tier section. Dress Circle section, 
Balcony Circle section, and Boxes, with a total of 378. Further, 
with the facilities provided through cord sets there is hardly a 
location within the auditorium of the Opera House that cannot 
be connected with one of the outlets. 

Programs carry announcements as to the procedure required to 
procure one of these sets, and it has been simplified so that the 
user can apply for a set at the time of purchasing the seat, and 
the set is installed by the usher on arrival for the performance. 

Through this, the Board has presented the opportunity of hear- 
ing performances to those who otherwise could not receive this 
enjoyment. 

OPERA GUILD ROOM AND LIBRARY 

The Board granted to the San Francisco Opera Guild the use 
of one of the rooms in the north corridor of the Opera House for 
a musical reference library and headquarters. 

We hope in this w^ay to bring the Opera Guild into closer 
relations with the Board of Trustees so that they may feel that 
the Opera House is their home — with the fond hope on our part 
that they will follow in the footsteps of the Metropolitan Opera 
Guild who have added so much personal interest and beauty to 
the Metropolitan Opera House through their donations of paint' 
ings and statuary pertaining to the Arts. 

[11] 



FLOOD LIGHTING 

In cooperation with Mr. Arthur Brown, Jr., the official and 
honorary architect of the War Memorial, a project is being de' 
veloped tor the flood lighting of the War Memorial, including in 
this scheme the lighting of the Veterans Building, Memorial 
Court, and the Opera House, in conformity with the City Hall 
to the east on Van Ness Avenue, with the purpose of bringing 
in the broad Avenue as a central focal point in the form of a 
plaza, uniting the group as a whole by the use of a unified 
fluorescent lighting system. 

This project will ultimately demand a considerable expenditure 
but is so developed that it could be created a small part at a time, 
and on the last meeting of the Board in November, an authorized 
appropriation of $2500 v/as earmarked from the War Memorial 
Reserve Fund for this purpose and plans are under way for an 
immediate start on this project, which will add so much beauty 
to the Memorial. 

It is my suggestion, respectfully submitted to the incoming 
President, that a continuing committee be appointed to carry on 
this project to its ultimate conclusion. 

FEDERAL ART PROJECT (W.P.A.) 

Very little has been accomplished on this project but it is hoped 
that this committee will continue and we will be able to take 
advantage in the future of any opportunity for the carrying out 
of the interior beautification of the Veterans Building, and the 
ultimate possibility of the construction of a fountain or appro' 
priate statuary in the Memorial Court. 

PARKING 

Through the special committee headed by Trustee Schofield 
and with the cooperation of our Secretary and the Secretary of the 
American Legion War Mem.orial Commission, a new develop^ 
ment was instigated in the handling of traffic during the peak 
usage of the Buildings. This was first put into effect during the 
recent Grand Opera Season and was very successful. Traffic was 
handled with greater smoothness and facility than ever before. 

[12] 



OTHER DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES 
PUBLICITY 

The War Memorial group is increasingly receiving favorable 
publicity throughout the United States and Europe, through the 
operation of the San Francisco Museum of Art, the San Fran' 
Cisco Symphony, and the Opera House. Articles of comment 
were noted in some of the leading maga2,ines, the Nev^^ York 
Times, Chicago Tribune, and in musical papers published 
throughout the world. 

The music critic of the New York Times visited San Francisco 
during the first week of the Grand Opera Season just closed. His 
impressions of the San Francisco War Memorial Opera House 
and of the opening night appeared in the New York Times, and 
the following is quoted therefrom: 

'The San Francisco War Memorial Opera House is a sign of 
the times which may well presage a better day for the lyric 
theatre in America. Not that any building, however modern, 
commodious or attractive in appearance can make a great per' 
formance or a great opera, either. These evolutions depend upon 
processes which cannot be induced by the manipulation of steel, 
stone and mortar. But much that is constructive in the musico' 
dramatic art can be stimulated by the creation of Opera houses 
which represent unmistakably what they stand for in the com' 
munity, and furnish the best facilities for artistic achievement. 

The Opera House of San Francisco is that kind of an edifice. 
Its place in the design of the city, its impressive but not academic 
or frigid architecture; the plan of its interior and the technical 
resources of its stage are well conducive to the conditions in 
which music drama can flourish. 

It is more remindful of Europe than America to behold an 
opera house with its own grounds and squares, streets, con' 
courses, in, so to speak, its own right, which does not convey the 
impression of something stuck in the middle of a business block 
for purposes of convenience and profit. Here is the sense of 
spaciousness — even of cultivated leisure, and a place intended as a 
home of art and beauty." 

VISITORS TO THE OPERA HOUSE 

For the accommodation of visitors, a guide is on duty at the 
Opera House. The following are extracts from his report for the 
period from January 1st, 1939, to December 6th, 1939: 

[13] 




[ 141 



"During this time, 6,534 visitors were taken through the 
Opera House by the guide, which was a marked increase over 
previous years. During the period covered by the report, guests 
from British Columbia, Hawaii, and every state in the Union 
except Vermont have signed the Opera House register. Our own 
Cahfornia led the list with the greatest number of registrations 
and the State of Washington was a close second. 

Foreign countries hsted on the register include Canada, New 
Zealand, France, Peru, Australia, England, Philippine Islands, 
Germany, Sweden, Italy, Denmark, Switzerland, Egypt, Scot' 
land, Uruguay, South Africa, Persia, British India, Mexico, 
Guatemala, Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, China, Brazil, 
Japan, Austria, Czecho Slovakia, and Belgium. 

Many special groups were included such as schools, Parent- 
Teacher Associations, Scouts, Art Associations, civic and con- 
vention groups, and organized tourist parties here for the ExpO' 
sition." 

Visitors included many distinguished guests from throughout 
the world, and I would like to give you the closing remarks of the 
guide in his annual report: 

"all in all it has been a good year. The fame of the Opera 
House, its beauty and equipment, is gradually going to the 
four corners of the globe, and the news is being carried 
there by those who paid us a visit." 

We have received during the year, many letters of commenda- 
tion particularly from the users of the War Memorial for con' 
vention purposes and our staff and Managing Director, the Sec 
retary, and those in subordinate positions are continually being 
mentioned for their fine attention to the needs and desires of the 
tenants. 

TRUSTEES^ ROOM 

This room is becoming one of the show places of the Opera 
House, containing as it does walls covered with pictures of prom- 
inent artists who appeared in the Opera House, and the official 
guest book in which all the artists who have appeared in the Opera 
House (since the establishment of this book) have signed. 

This beautiful guest book of parchment, made possible by the 
Carmel Fallon Fund, is becoming more valuable with each passing 
year, and it is now one of the traditions of the artistic world to be 
registered in the guest book of the San Francisco War ^^^emorial 
Opera House. 

[15} 



The use of the Trustees' Room is growing — I believe to the sat' 
isfaction of the Trustees — providing as it does the opportunity 
of extending courtesies to distinguished guests and friends at the 
Opera House. 

ALLOCATION OF EARNED INCOME 

Projects for the future, approved by the Board for develc^pment 
as funds become available, are listed under the following titles: 

New Elevator for Opera House stage. 

Additional lighting for Veterans Building meeting halls. 

Sidewalk repairs in front of the Veterans Building. 

Additional seats Opera House. 

Anti'slipping treatment Opera House stairs. 

Installation of vents and louvres for Veterans Club. 

Augmented ventilating system Dress Circle and Balcony, 
Opera House. 

Downward spots for Veterans Auditorium. 

Scenery sets for miscellaneous concerts in Opera House. 

W. P. A. Mural Projects (material costs). 

Awnings for Veterans Building entrance on Van Ness Avenue. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE WAR 
MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 

The Subscription Collection Department, headed by Eldon B. 
Spofford as attorney for the Board, closed its file as it felt that 
further collections on the subscription account were improbable. 

PANAMA PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION TRUSTEESHIP 
FELLOWSHIP 

By the funds left in trust by the Panama Pacific International 
Exposition Trusteeship in dissolution, a scholarship was made 
effective for the Spring semester of 1938 at the University of 
California. This scholarship was changed to a Fellowship in 
Pacific Coast History, with an approximate income of $600.00 
per year. The stipend for this year was $720.00, and the current 
holder is John Denton Carter. The holder for the 1938-39 
college year was James F. King. 

[16] 



The earlier appointed Fellows spent most of their time catalog- 
ing material which was deposited with the University of Cali- 
fornia. Mr. King recently filed a report on this material with this 
Board through the graduate school of the University. I believe 
that from now on the Fellowship will prove of great value for the 
purpose intended. 

The cash value of the Fund is approximately $1 5,000.00, and is 
invested in long term securities certified for investment by the 
State Banking Commission. 

FILMS 

A complete collection of m.otion picture films of the activities 
during the operation of the Panama Pacific International Exposi- 
tion are on deposit. These were offered to the Golden Gate In- 
ternational Exposition for recutting and retitling but so far have 
not been in use. 

As the years go on these films should prove of historic interest. 

MURALS 

We received forty murals from the Panama Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition and have placed the following to date: 

Eight Brangwyns are in the Veterans Auditorium and con- 
stitute the main decorative motif therein. 

Two duMonds are in the San Francisco Public Library. 

Eight Robert Rieds are in the Palace of Fine Arts Rotunda 
and were recently rehabilitated under a W.P.A. Federal 
Arts project. 

"The Lure of the Atlantic" is at the Press Club, San 
Francisco. 

Three — "Spring", "Seedtime" and "Harvest" are at the Lux 
School, San Francisco. 

Four — "Summer", "Festivity", "Fruition" and "Autumn" 

are at the Veterans Home at Yountville. 
Most of the remaining murals are in poor condition but a few are 
usable and we hope to place them shortly. 

[17] 




THF. BRANr;\VYN MURALS 
ALDITORIUM. VITI RAN'S BUILDING 



[ 18] 



HISTORY SETS 

Effort was made to place these sets in public libraries and 
schools throughout the United States, and also in foreign re' 
search libraries on request. To date some three hundred sets have 
been distributed with an equal number remaining on hand. 

CARMEL FALLON FUND 

In the distribution of the estate of Annie Malone, as approved 
by the courts in 1933, a share was set aside to the "Trustees of 
the San Francisco War Memorial", for construction, improve- 
ment or maintenance of the Opera House. This bequest was to 
be known as the "Carmel Fallon Fund", in memory of the mother 
of Annie Malone. Small sums have been reali2,ed from time to 
time, which have been used for the purposes intended, including 
the guest book installed in the Trustees' room, and a fine plaque, 
commemorating the first performance ever held in the Opera 
House, that of "La Tosca" on October 15, 1932. 

A small remaining balance of approximately one hundred dol- 
lars is in this fund, and as the estate is still in the process of dis- 
tribution, further funds may be expected from time to time, 
which receipts should be used for the purpose of permanent 
adornment of the Opera House. 

WAR MEMORIAL GROUP 
EMPLOYMENT 

The War Memorial Department, and the various tenants of 
the two buildings, provide employment for a considerable number 
of San Francisco citi2,ens. 

There are regularly 120 and temporarily 285 employees, segre- 
gated as follows: 

Department employees 41 

Regular Staff of Opera and Symphony 15 

Art Museum 22 

A. L. War Memorial Commission and allied 

groups 40 



Genealogical Library 



2 



Total Regular Employees 120 

[19] 



Temporary Employees divided among 
Orchestra 
Chorus 
Ballet 

House Service 
Other Temporary Employees 28'> 

Some of this temporary employment lasts for a few months 
and some during a greater portion of the year. 



USE OF FACILITIES 
VETERANS BUILDING 

The Veterans Building, that portion of the War Memorial 
tenanted under the operation of the American Legion War 
Memorial Commission, contains three floors, a large section of 
the basement, and also the Veterans Auditorium. 

There are 178 individual units of various War Veteran or- 
ganizations and their auxiliaries now meeting regularly in this 
Building. The majority of the organizations who meet in the 
Veterans Building use the meeting halls on the average of twice 
each month, and the records of the various halls of the Building 
indicate that for the year 1939 there were 4,969 individual uses 
of meeting halls, and Board Rooms which total twentytwo in 
number. Many of these rooms are used twice on the same day 
— an average for each meeting hall and room of 29 times per 
month. 

The record of use of the Veterans Building during the past 
year and the permanent registration list indicate clearly that the 
Building is now operating very closely to capacity for five days 
and nights of each week, the slack night being Saturday on which 
night very few organizations hold meetings. 

It is, of course, impossible to report a definite record of at' 
tendance at the meetings held in the Veterans Building but from 
the normal membership of the various units and the normal at- 
tendance at the meetings a safe average attendance per meeting is 
estimated at fifty persons, which v.^ould make the total attendance 
for the year of 248,450. 

[20] 



In addition to the use of meeting halls and band practice rooms 
which are covered by the above, there is the use of the Veterans 
Auditorium, with a seating capacity of 1106. Many types of 
affairs are held therein — concerts, lectures, shows of various 
kinds, receptions, large meetings of veteran organi2;ations, and 
dances. The Auditorium was used 130 times during the year. The 
attendance at these various affairs fluctuates considerably but a 
fair average would be 500 persons per affair, making a total of 
65,000. 

Further, there is a constant day and night use of the Club, 
Women's Lounge and Green Room in the Veterans Building — the 
facilities of which are confined to those veterans who belong to a 
regularly constituted and recognized war veteran organi2;ation 
and members of their families. The Club operates from 12:00 
noon to 2:00 A.M., six days per week, throughout the year. It 
is open occasionally on Sunday for day use only. 

Also, there are on the first floor of the Veterans Building the 
offices and headquarters of the various veteran organi2,ations 
whose headquarters are open each business day, and with con' 
siderable traffic resulting. However, it is impossible to estimate 
with any degree of accuracy the number of persons who are dailv 
in the Building for transaction of business in their headquarters. 

Four conventions were held in the Veterans Auditorium dur' 
ing the year — the two principal ones being the National Educa' 
tion Association and the American Bar Association, which not 
alone used the Auditorium but also the meeting halls during the 
day periods. These conventions were handled with very little 
additional expense to the Board of Trustees because of the fine 
cooperation of the American Legion War Memorial Commission 
and the San Francisco Department of Public Schools who sup' 
plied much needed temporary equipment. 

The total number of people using this Building during 1939 
was 313,450, which is exclusive of the office and casual traffic to 
the Club and Lounge, and exclusive of conventions, and indicates 
that the facilities are being used to practically their fullest extent 
and are fulfilling completely their function for which this Build' 
ing was intended. The conduct of the management of the 

[21} 



Building, through the American Legion War Memorial Commis' 
sion, is excellent and justifies the confidence of the citi2;ens of San 
Francisco and the Board of Trustees in directing this responsi' 
bility to the Commission. 

LIBRARY OF THE CALIFORNIA SOCIETY OF 
THE SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

This Library is situated on the third floor of the Veteran? 
Building, is considered one of the finest genealogical libraries in 
Western United States, and is used particularly by students of 
early American history. 

There are approximately six thousand volumes in this Library, 
as well as unusual charts, manuscripts and pamphlets; also many 
individual family records, town, county and state history, and 
unusual town vital statistics prior to 1850. 

The Library is open daily to the public Monday to Friday, 
inclusive, and on the first and third Saturday of each month. 

A total of 1652 people visited this Library for the purpose of 
study and research during the past year. 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

This Museum, one of the most progressive museums in the 
United States, occupies the entire fourth floor and a portion of 
the basement of the Veterans Building. This is the Museum of 
the San Francisco Art Association, and is under the direction of 
Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley. 

This is one of the finest contributions in the War Memorial 
Group to the citi2;ens of San Francisco. Situated as it is in down' 
town metropolitan San Francisco, it is one of the few museums 
that is available to the public in the evening. The Museum is 
open every evening until 10:00. Proper viewing is made possible 
through the improved and modern artificial lighting facilities 
which are considered the leading standard of their particular class. 

The San Francisco Museum of Art is recogni2;ed by the pro' 
fession as among the few leading museums in this country in its 
active educational work, instructional study, exhibits, in the 
technique of the presentation of exhibits, and its enlightened 
pohcy in regard to collections. It is outstanding in promoting and 

[23} 




[24] 



aiding art growth in the community by exhibiting the works of 
living artists and by the broad knowledge, scholarly presentation 
and interpretation of all that is going on in the art world today. 

An outstanding achievement is the enrollment of children for 
free Saturday morning induction in the appreciation of art. No 
formal instruction is given but materials are furnished free, and 
the children are encouraged to learn by use the method of the 
artists, and to become familiar with the Museum as a place for 
enjoyment. 

The Museum has received favorable publicity throughout the 
United States through radio broadcasting and in all the national 
art publications. This, in part, is due to the high attainments of 
the Director, whose ability has been recogni2,ed by her inclusion 
on the Boards of many of the outstanding art groups in the 
country. 

A careful check was kept for statistical purposes on the at- 
tendance. There were approximately 125,000 visitors to the 
Museum during 1939. Over 110 exhibits were given during the 
year of which approximately one-third were largely or wholly 
given to the Art of the West. Sixty 'three free public lectures have 
been given, 79 meetings on art and art study held. Three hun- 
dred children are regularly enrolled in the free Saturday hours, 
with a total attendance for the three years of this work of 23,919. 

The Art Library, an outstanding collection of books, cata- 
logues, etc., devoted to the Arts, is widely used by research 
workers and students. Registered use for the year was 2527. 

SAN FRANCISCO WAR MEMORIAL 
OPERA HOUSE 

All the elements necessary for beauty, convenience and mechan- 
ical perfection have been assembled to make the War Memorial 
Opera House the outstanding structure of its kind, and it is the 
only municipally owned Opera House in the United States. Its 
erection has been more than justified by the constantly growing 
use, and our Grand Opera Seasons are rapidly being accepted on 
a par with the Metropolitan of New York. 

During the year 1939, there were 136 performances of various 
kinds, attended by an estimated 342,000 people. In addition, seven 

[25] 




[26] 



conventions held at least a portion of their sessions in the Opera 
House, totaUing seventeen days with an attendance of 30,000. 
The following estimates arc interesting, and indicate the wide use 
of facilities: 

ARTISTIC PERFORMANCES, OPERAS, SYMPHONIES, MISCEL- 
LANEOUS PERFORMANCES 

No. OF Estimated 

Shows Atiekdance 

Grand Opera Season (Opera Association) 17 52,000 

San Carlo Opera Season 20 42,500 

Symphony Season of the Musical Association of San 

Francisco (including YPS) 34 97,000 

Federal Music Project Symphonies 6 15,000 

Art Commission Symphony 1 3,500 

Ballet Russe (Art Commission) 8 25,000 

Peter Conley Attractions 13 34,000 

Opera Association Concert Division 5 12,000 

Paul Posz Attractions 3 6,000 

Brother Leo lectures (St. Mary's) 4 10,000 

Japanese Ballet 2 6,500 

Other shows, meetings, lectures II 25,')00 

Teachers' Institutes (days) 4 7,000 

High School and College Graduations 8 16,000 

136 342,000 
CONVENTIONS 

General Federation of Women's Cluhs parts of 5 days 

American Library Association 1 

Eastern Star 1 (night) 

Fire Chiefs 1 

National Education Association parts of 4 

American Bar Association parts of 3 

Salvation Army parts of 2 

17 Days 
Estimated Attendance at Conventions 30,000 

17th ANNUAL GRAND OPERA SEASON 

The 17th Annual Grand Opera Season was an outstanding 
success both artistically and financially. No further contribu' 
tions were required from the guarantor members: 

REPERTOIRE: 

Manon, Massenet 

Die Walkure, Wagner (two performances) 
Madame Butterfly, Puccini (two performances) 
Tristan und Isolde, Warner 



[27] 



RiGOLETTO, Verdi (two performances) 

Lucia di Lammermooh, Donizetti 

Otello, Verdi 

La Traviata, Verdi 

Barber of Seville, Rossini 

FiDELio, Beethoven 

I Pagliacci, Leoncavallo 
Cavalleria Rusticana, Mascagni 

II Trovatore, Verdi 

Presenting, among others, the following outstanding guest 
artists: 

Charlotte Bocrner Alexander Kipnis 

Michael Bartlctt Marjoric Lawrence 

Richard Bonelli Giovanni Martinelli 

George Cehanovsky Nino Martini 

Norman Cordon Kathryn Meisle 

Louis d'Angelo Lauritz Melchior 

Kirsten Flagstad Lily Pons 

Dusnlina Giannini Jarmila Novotna 

Hertha Glatz Elisabeth Rethberg 

Julius Huehn Bidu Sayao 

Frederick Jagel Tito Schipa 
Lawrence Tibbett 



MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 

This Association maintains the San Francisco Symphony. The 
Fall and Spring Symphony Seasons bring music lovers locally and 
from distant points. The Opera Fiouse, in its magnificent sur' 
roundings, is a perfect setting, and thirty-four performances were 
presented to large and appreciative audiences. 

Through cooperation of this Board and the assistance of an 
appropriation from the tax rate the San Francisco Musical Asso- 
ciation has been able to keep the charges for performances so rea- 
sonable that all those who wish can afford the indulgence and 
pleasure. 

The Musical Association, like the San Francisco Opera Asso' 
ciation, maintains fully staffed offices, practice and storage rooms 
in the Opera House. 

In addition to the regular performances, there were almost con- 
stant rehearsals during the season by the orchestra. 

[2S] 



CONCESSIONAIRE (Opera House) 

It is recommended that a careful study be made of the Con' 
cessionaire's contract by the incoming Opera Committee of the 
Board. A casual investigation indicated that the rental is on the 
basis of approximately 25% of the gross income and if these facts 
are verified indicates too high a percentage which will eventually 
reflect in our service to the public. 

The gross income for the 1937'38 season, a period of twelve 
months including one Grand Opera Season, was $14,050.00, 
whereas, for the 1938--39 season, a period of fifteen months and 
including two Grand Opera Seasons, the gross was $24,670.00. 



[29] 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 
VETERANS" BUILDING 

Attendance at meetings 248,450 

Attendance at Auditt)rium atl'airs 65,000 

Genealogical Library 1,652 

Club Room, Lounge and office visitors 50,000 

Conventions 3,000 368,102 



ART MUSEUM, including Library 125,000 

OPERA HOUSE 

Attendance at performances 342,000 

Attendance at conventions 30,000 

Guide-conducted tours 6,524 378,524 



Total Estimated and registered attendance. . 871,626 



BUDGETS AND INCOME 

Follows the 1939'4r) budget allowance for the fiscal year, with 
comparative figures for prior years: 



GENERAL BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 

1939- 1938- 1937- 1936- 

1940 1939 1938 1937 

Permanent Salaries 78,673 78,673 78,673 71,460 

Temporary Salaries 5,263 5,263 5,263 5,000 

Wages 1,750 1,750 ],750 1,500 

Contractual Services 4,200 5,700 6,150 2,833 

Heat, Light and Power 14,500 13,000 13,000 14,000 

Materials and Supplies 4,000 4,500 4,500 5,000 

Equipment 500 

(Supplemental) 2,000 

Services of other departments 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 

War Memorial Reslrve 5,640 

A— Gross Totals— General .... 118,026 113,386 115,836 103,843 

B— Less Transfers— General .. —15,680 —14,680 —16,450 —14,383 

C— Net Totals— General 102,346 98,706 99,386 89,460 



[30] 



ART MUSEUM APPROPRIATIONS 

Permanent Salaries 

Temporary Salaries 

Heat, Light and Power 

Materials and Supplies 

A'l Gross Totals — Art Museum 
B'l Less Transfers — Art 

Museum 

C'l Net Totals — Art Museum . . 

Grand Gross Totals (A plus A- 1) 
Less Total Transfers 

(B plus B'l) 

Net Grand Totals (C plus C-l) 110,241 



6,960 
43 5 

7,500 
500 


6,960 
435 

8,000 
500 


6,960 
435 

8,000 
500 


5,220 
435 

8,000 
750 


1^395 
—7,500 


15,895 

—8,000 


15,895 

—8,000 


14,405 
^8,000 


7,895 


7,895 


7,895 


6,405 


133,421 
—23,180 ■ 


129,281 
—22,680 - 


131,731 
—24,450 • 


118,248 
—22,383 


110,241 


106,601 


107,281 


95,865 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EARNINGS 
By Fiscal Years 

Required by 

Appropriation ACTUAL 

1939-40 Ordinance RECEIPTS 

Opera House $31,000.00 $22,350.00 (Estimated 

Concessions 2,000.00 2,100.00 to 12/31 

Veterans Auditorium 4,000.00 1,3 50.00 6 mos.) 

Miscellaneous 600.00 35.00 

TOTALS $37,600.00 $25,835.00 

1938-39 

Opera House $30,000.00 $33,296.00 

Concessions 3,750.00 2,063.00 

Veterans Auditorium 3,000.00 4,900.00 

Miscellaneous 3 5.00 55.00 

TOTALS $36,785.00 $40,314.00 

1937-38 

Opera House $29,000.00 $38,710.00 

Concessions 3,750.00 3,062.00 

Veterans Building 3,000.00 3,975.00 

Miscellaneous . . .'^ 35.00 52.00 

TOTALS $35,785.00 $45,799.00 

1936-37 

Opera House $29,000.00 $33,727.00 

Concessions 3,750.00 3,1 12.00 

Veterans Building 1,500.00 5,175.00 

Miscellaneous . ^ 3 5.00 67.00 

TOTALS $34,285.00 $42,081.00 

[31] 



NET OPERATING COSTS— By Fiscal Years 

J938-39 J937'38 1936-37 
GROSS EXPENDITURES, as shown on 
Comparative Budaict Allowance and 

Expenditure Shect^ $129,281 $131,731 $118,248 

Department Receipts, per Statement of 

Earnings 40,314 4>,799 42,081 

Actual Net Operating Costs to Tax- 
payers ^. $ S8,9o7 $ 85,932 $ 76,167 

The Net Operating Cost to Taxpayers does not include bond 
interest or redemption charges. The original expenditures for the 
War Memorial of San Francisco were $6,250,000, of which 
$2,000,000 were contributions, gifts, etc., $250,000 appropria- 
tions from the municipal government, and $4,000,000 a bond 
issue. These were 4^- per cent bonds, maturing $200,000 per 
year 1932 to 1951, inclusive. The outstanding balance today is 
$2,400,000. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

As your President, I submit the following for the considera' 
tion of the Board. I recommend that 

(a) William Douglas, the Board's Secretary, be given the 
title of Assistant Managing Director and Secretary; 
that he have direct responsibility under the Managing 
Director for personnel, material and maintenance, and 
that he be relieved of office routine and detail work 
through the employment of an additional clerk. If this 
recommendation is carried out, it will, in my opinion, 
greatly add to the efficient and proper management of 
the Buildings. With the large number of employees and 
the vast responsibility and hundreds of rooms of wide 
usage, a direct responsibility for personnel, material, and 
maintenance should be placed on a member of the 
executive staff and Mr. Douglas has shown his ability to 
carry out this phase of our activities. 

(b) That we continue the WPA Mural Project and make a 
serious eifort to bring this matter to completion. 

[32] 



(c) Recommend to the Budget Committee that they include 
in their request for this year, a permanent painter. A)l 
those famihar with the Buildings well realise that this is 
an absolute necessity and dependence on the Depart' 
ment of Public Works for painting has been entirely 
unsatisfactory and difficult to include definitely in any 
budget. 

(d) The janitorial staff should be increased by a minimum of 
four janitors. 

(e) Ventilation of the Opera House Balcony Circle and the 
Veterans Club — Provisions should be made in our 
budget this year for this work, which has become neces' 
sary for the comfort of the users. From the rough esti" 
mates we have had, this work can be accomplished for 
approximately $6,500. 

(f) Awnings for the Veterans Building should also be in- 
cluded in this year's budget. This item has been on our 
preferred list for some time. 

(g) Minutes — At the present time our minutes are kept in 
the form of a file system. Recommend that bound min' 
ute books in volume form be used. The initial expense 
is not very great and the continuing expense small, but 
in this manner we will have a current library of activi' 
ties available for the members of the Board and other 
interested parties at all times. 

(h) Suggest that a continuing committee be appointed on 
the Flood Light Project. 

Submitted, 

Ralph J. A. Stern, 

President 



[33] 



BOARDS OF TRUSTEES 

cl" tiic 

WAR MEMORIAL OF SAX FRANCISCO 

1930* 
TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T. Cameron. Vice-President 

Frank N. Bclgrano. Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bcntley James I. Herz James W. Mullen 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



Original Board, confirmed by Board of Supervisors. March 3. 1930. 

1931 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T. Cameron. Vice-Preside-)tt 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley James I. Herz James W. Mullen"' 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



James W. Mullen died July 25. 1931. 

1932 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury. President Gcoige T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley* James I. Herz Harry A. Miltonf 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



* Robert I. Bentley died February 22. 193 2. 

t Harry A. Milton confirmed January 18. 1932. vice James W. Mullen, deceased. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director ' W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

Appointed November 1,1932. Appointed September 8. 

1933 
TRUSTEES 
K. R. Kingsbury, Pre.sicIeiU George T. Cameron. Vice-Pre.sident 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. lames I. Herz lohn A. McGregorf 

Colbert Coldwell* Charles H. Kendrick Harry A. Milton 

Jesse C. Colman General Hunter Liggett Richard M. Tobin 



'•'Colbert Coldwell confirmed January 2, 1933, vice George Hearst, term expired, 
t John A. McGregor confirmed January 2. 1933, vice Robert I. Bentley, deceased. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer. Managing Direct.>r W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1934 
TRUSTEES 
K. R. Kingsbury, Pre.sident George T. Cameron. Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. James I. Herz* John A. McGregor 

Colbert Coldwell Charles H. Kendrick Harry A, Milton 

Jesse C. Colman General Hunter Liggett Richard M. Tobin 



James I. Herz resigned February. 1934. Col. Wm. FI. Tobin.. U. S, A.. Ret., con- 
firmed March 5, 1934. vice James I. Herz. 

[34] 



STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

193? 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury,* President George T. Cameron,* J Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. Charles H. Kendrick Allison E. Schofield f J 

Colbert Coldwell John A. McGregor Ralph J. A. Stern f 

Hon. Thomas M. Foleyf Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 



* K. R. Kingsbury and George T. Cameron resigned December, 193?. Joseph S. 

Thompson and J. H. Threikeld confirmed December 9, 1935, vice K. R. Kings- 

bury and George T. Cameron, respectively, 
f Hon. Thomas M. Foley, Allison E. Schofield and Ralph J. A. Stern confirmed 

January 28, 1935, vice General Hunter Liggett, Richard M. Tobin and Jesse C. 

Colman, respectively, terms expired, 
t Allison E. Schofield elected Vice-President May 2, 1935. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretarv 

1936 
TRUSTEES 
Allison E. Schofield, President J. H. Threlkeld.f V!ce-Pre5tdent 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr.* Charles H. Kendrick Ralph J. A. Stern 

Colbert Coldwell John A. McGregor Joseph S. Thompson 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

* Frank N. Belgrano, Jr., resigned October, 1936. Ramsay Moran confirmed October 

26, 1936, vice Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. 
t J. H. Threikeld elected Vice-President March 19, 1936. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1937 
TRUSTEES 

Allison E. Schofield, President J. H. Threikeld, Vice-President 

Harold J. Boyd* Charles H. Kendrick Ramsay Moran 

Colbert Coldwell f John A. McGregor J Ralph J. A. Stern 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

* Harold J. Boyd confirmed January 4, 1937, vice Joseph S. Thompson, term ex- 

pired; resigned, June, 1937; John J. Sullivan confirmed June 21, 1937, vice 
Harold J. Boyd. 

t Colbert Coldwell resigned July. 1937. Dr. Aianson Weeks confirmed x'\ugust 2, 
1937. vice Colbert^Coldwell. 

t John A. McGregor resigned February, 1937. Horace B. Clifton confirmed Febru- 
ary 8, 1937, vice John A. McGregor. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managiiig Director W. C. Douglas. Secretary 

1938 
TRUSTEES 
J. H. Threikeld, President Ralph J. A. Stern. Vice-President 

Horace B. Clifton Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Ramsay Moran Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Charles H. Kendrick* Allison E. Schofield Dr. Aianson Weeks 



* Charles H. Kendrick resigned March, 1938. Frederick J. Koster confirmed April 
1938, vice Charles H. Kendrick. 

[35] 



STAFF 
Sdby Oppenheiiner. Managing Director \V. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1939 
TRUSTEES 
Ralph J. A. Stern. President Horace B. Clifton,* Vice-President 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley f Ramsay Moran J. H. Threlkeld 

Frederick J. Koster Allison E. Schoficld Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan Dr. Alanson Weeks 



* Horace B. Clifton died October 25, 1939. 

t Hon. Thomas M. Foley elected Vice-President November 16. 1939. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer. Managing Director W. C. Douglas. Secretary 



[36] 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1940 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



WAR MEMORIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



December 19, 1940 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Angelo J. Rossi 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War IMemorial of San Francisco 

Judge Thomas M. Foley. President 

Ramsey Moran, Vice-President 

Frederick J. Koster 

Harry A. Milton 

Allison E. Schofield 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

John J. Sullivan 

J. H. Threlkeld 

Colonel William H. Tobin 

Dr. Allanson Weeks 



War Memorial Staff 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director 
Ira G. Thompson, Secretary to the Board 



December 19, 1940. 

To His Honor The Mayor of San Francisco and to the 
Board of Trustees of the War Memorial of San Francisco: 

This is the final meeting of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial of the City and County of San Francisco for the year 
1940, and, according to custom, I submit my concluding report 
as President of this Board. 

Firstly I desire to express my gratitude to the members of 
the Board, to the ^Managing Director and to our Secretary and 
to all the employees of this institution for the splendid coopera- 
tion accorded me during the past year. The administration of 
this great memorial requires hard work, intelligent interest and 
constant attention to duty. These two magnificent monuments 
are dedicated to those citizens of San Francisco who laid down 
their lives upon the altar of sacrifice for their country; our pur- 
pose being to serve as a living utility to the memory of the dead. 
Also, we house the artistic, cultural and dramatic accomplish- 
ments of the people of San Francisco. 

The opportunity to have served in this capacity has been one 
that will be long remembered by me. It is a privilege to partici- 
pate in this fine work and be a part of the cultural and educational 
activities of a great city, whose reputation therefor is a byword 
throughout the world. 

Respectfully, 

Judge Thomas M. Foley. 



My report follows: 
In Memoriam : 

The death of our Secretary, William C. Douglas, on April 30, 
1940, left a great void and a deep feeling of loss in the entire 
membership of the Board and in the community. The following 
resolution was spread upon our minutes: 

[ 7 ] 



Whereas: William Crumbaugh Douglas was called out of 
this world by death on April 30, 1940; and 

Whereas: William Crumbaugh Douglas served his country 
faithfully and well during the World War, having been a 
First Lieutenant in the 62nd Coast Artillery Regiment. 
United States Army, stationed in France from August, 1918, 
to January, 1919; and 

Whereas: William Crumbaugh Douglas was at the time of 
his passing Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the War 
]Memorial of San Francisco, which position he had held 
since its establishment, having been appointed September 
8, 1932; and 

Whereas: William Crumbaugh Douglas was at the time of 
his passing the oldest employee in point of service in the 
War Memorial Department, having served since the be- 
ginning of the construction period ; and 

Whereas: William Crumbaugh Douglas gave unstintingly 
of his time and efforts to the War ^Memorial Department, 
discharging his duties in a most loyal, efficient and trust- 
worthy manner, displaying at all times in his dealings with 
his fellow employees, and with all with whom he came in 
contact, a kindly, considerate, friendly spirit which en- 
deared him to all who knew him ; 

Now, Therefore, be it Resolved: That the Board of Trustees 
of the War Memorial of San Francisco, individually and as 
a unit of the municipal government of the City and County 
of San Francisco, recognizes the splendid, faithful service 
of William Crumbaugh Douglas; that this Board of Trus- 
tees expresses its deepest regret at his passing, and that this 
Board of Trustees extends to the widow its heartfelt sym- 
pathy in her bereavement ; and 

Further Resolved: That this resolution be spread upon the 
minutes of this meeting and that a copy thereof be for- 
warded to ^Irs. Edna May Douglas, relict of William Crum- 
baugh Douglas. 



[ 8 ] 



Committee Assignments for the Year 1940: 



Budget and Finance: 
(Including E E I. E. 
Fellowship) 



Art Association: 



Opera and Symphony: 



EEL E. Murals: 
FuBLic Relations : 
Veterans: 



WEA Murals Froject: 
Allocation of 

Earned Income: 
Flood Lighting: 

Traffic and Parking: 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Members 



Chairman 
Members 



Chairman 
Members 

Chairman 
Chairman 
Chairman 
Members 



Chairman 

Chairman 

Chairman 

Member 

Chairman 

Members 



Vice-Eresident Moran 
Trustee Schofield 
Trustee Milton 
Trustee Koster 
Trustee Dr. Weeks 
Trustee Koster 
Trustee Threlkeld 
Trustee Colonel Tobin 
Trustee Dr. Weeks 
Trustee Stern 
Trustee Koster 
Trustee Schofield 
Trustee Colonel Tobin 
Trustee Milton 
Trustee Schofield 
Eresident Foley 
Trustee Moran 
Trustee Colonel Tobin 
Trustee Threlkeld 

Trustee Sullivan 
Trustee Stern 
Trustee IMilton 
Trustee Schofield 
Trustee Colonel Tobin 
Trustee Dr. Weeks 



Due to illness, the services of Trustee John H. Threlkeld were 
not available during most of the year and his advice and counsel 
were sorely missed. 

A great portion of the Board's work is accomplished through 
committees, and because of their nature the following com- 
mittees bore a large portion of the Board's activities: 
Budget and Finance: 

Vice-Eresident Ramsay INIoran, Chairman 
Opera and Symphony: 

Trustee Ralph J. A. Stern, Chairman 
Veterans: 

Trustee Allison E. Schofield, Chairman 



[ 9 ] 





[10] 



Trustee Harry Milton contributed in large measure to the 
success of our institution in his handling of the labor relations, 
and Trustee Fred Koster contributed greatly by his liaison with 
the Art group. 

Relations with Tenants: 

Harmony existed throughout the year between the Board and 
the tenants of the buildings. Dr. Grace L. ]\IcCann Morley, Di- 
rector of the San Francisco Museum of Art; Mr. Charles Kleup- 
fer, chairman of the American Legion War Memorial Commis- 
sion; ^Ir. Robert Watt Miller, president of the San Francisco 
Opera Association; ]Mrs. Henry Potter Russell, president of the 
San Francisco Opera Guild, and Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
president of the Musical Association of San Francisco, all co- 
operated in all problems. Mr. Paul Posz, Business Manager of 
the San Francisco Opera Association, served during the past 
season. ]Mr. Posz contributed in a large way to the success of the 
opera season in San Francisco, and in the management of the 
Opera Association's Concert Division has brought to our City 
a splendid concert season. It has been the pleasure of the Board 
to have worked with Mr. Posz. 

Also in this connection I desire to call attention to the fine 
work of Mr. W. B. Dorsett, General ^lanager of the American 
Legion War Memorial Commission. Mr. Dorsett has cooperated 
fully with the management and has handled the Veteran's Build- 
ing efficiently. 

The relations of the trustees and employees of the War ]Memo- 
rial and the employees of our tenants and concessionaires has 
been most satisfactory. Occasional slight differences of opinion 
were ironed out and settled with the invaluable aid and assistance 
of Trustee Harry Milton and other members of the Board. 

I am most happy to compliment the entire staff of the War 
Memorial upon their work. Department heads and their staffs, 
both in the Veterans' Building and Opera House, have rendered 
loyal and efficient service. 

[11] 



ACHIEVEMENTS 

Following is a resume of some of the more prominent achieve- 
ments during the year 1940: 

To expedite the handling of traffic and for the convenience of 
patrons and visitors to both the Opera House and the Veterans' 
Building, traffic lanes were painted in the front and in the rear 
of both buildings. 

The installation of a tie clock system for our watchmen was 
ordered, thus insuring complete coverage and protection of the 
property in the buildings at all times. 

A handsome plaque, bearing the names of Past Presidents of 
the Board of Trustees, together with a record of their terms of 
office, was installed in the main foyer of the Opera House. 

Light standards were installed in the Memorial Court to facili- 
tate the discharging of passengers from automobiles bringing 
patrons and visitors to events in the buildings. A portion of these 
lights have been ordered kept illuminated during the late even- 
ings during winter months for the convenience and protection 
of citizens using the Memorial Court as a passageway. 

The individual pictures in the world-renowned collection of 
photographs of operatic and concert stars, which adorns the 
walls of the Trustees' Room in the Opera House, were made more 
easily identifiable to the public by having the names of the artists 
lettered on the respective frames. 

Sand jars and smoking stands were purchased for the Opera 
House and the Veterans' Building for the convenience of patrons 

In order to keep War Memorial parking space clear prior to 
performances and also to preserve our parkway there against 
any possible claims of easement, chain barriers have been ordered 
installed at the entrances to the parking ramp in the rear of the 
Opera House. 

The hardwood floors in the South gallery of the Art Museum 
were sanded and refinished. 

[12] 



Approval was given to the installation of a beautiful memo- 
rial window in honor of the Grand Army of the Republic which 
has been placed by the Daughters of Union V^eterans of the Civil 
War at the landing on the North stairway between the second 
and third floor levels. Veterans' Building. 

The Board commissioned Mr. Otto Hintermann, an architect, 
to prepare a plan for a memorial to constitute the central motif 
for our Memorial Court. 

The sidewalks were ordered repaired and replaced in front 
of and about the Veterans' Building. The sidewalk step was 
eliminated from the front of the Veterans' Building after having 
been found to be a source of possible danger to pedestrians. 

Many experiments were conducted in the flood lighting of 
both the Veterans' Building and the Opera House. Various ex- 
periments were made with mazda, fluorescent and various other 
types of lighting. A system of illumination will be shortly devised 
that will bring out at night, in bold relief, the natural beauties 
of the buildings. 

A canopy for the front of the Veterans' Building, comparable 
to the one in front of the Opera House, has been installed. 

A study was made of the condition of the stairways leading 
from the main floor to the basement, front of the Opera House, 
with a view to eliminating the possibility of patrons slipping 
thereon. After much consideration and experiment this hazard 
has seemingly been eliminated. 

Necessary plaster repairs and repairs to furniture in both 
buildings were authorized. 

Spotlights in the Veterans' Auditorium were revamped to give 
better stage effects. 

The stone masonry in foyers and corridors of both the Vet- 
erans' Building and the Opera House was ordered regrouted 
where necessary. 

[13] 



The boxes in the Opera House have been repainted and re- 
gilded. 

The Board authorized the acceptance of a loan of various 
WPA art objects and the same were ordered installed in the 
Opera House. 

Picture INIolding has been installed on the Grand Tier floor 
crossover passageway in the Opera House. 

Major equipment purchases made during the year included: 
a piano truck for the Opera House grand piano, a vacuum cleaner 
for the cleaning of Venetian blinds and a power sprayer for use 
on our trees and for demothing furniture. 



Modified Fire Ordinances 

The Board of Supervisors of the City and County modified 
the existing fire ordinances with reference to theatres and show 
houses. Chief Charles J. Brennan of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, in the drafting of the new ordinance, consulted 
with the Board of Trustees as to our needs and desires, so that 
proper provisions for the safety of our patrons would be incor- 
porated in the new ordinance. Chief Brennan manifested a deep 
interest in our problems and worked with the Board to the end 
that an ordinance was ultimately passed that would assure a 
maximum of safety to patrons not only of the municipal Opera 
House, but of all show places in San Francisco. 



[14] 



POLICIES ADOPTED 

A new policy was adopted with reference to the letting of con- 
cessions in the Opera House, viz: Concessions for the past year 
were let on a flat paying basis. Investigation discloses that this 
system has proved most satisfactory. 

The Board also established and adopted a regular schedule 
of rates for the rental of the Opera House. This schedule covers 
all foreseeable events, based on our past experience. The War 
Memorial being a public institution, the Board believes that it 
should maintain a rigid adherence to this schedule of rates, and 
such has been the policy during the past year. 



FEDERAL ART PROJECT, WPA 

There is now under consideration by the Federal Art Project 
of the Works Progress Administration the complete finishing 
of the Souvenir Gallery in the Veterans' Building. 



VISITORS TO THE OPERA HOUSE 

For the convenience of visitors, a Guide is on duty in the 
Opera House. Following are extracts from his reports during 
1940: 

From Dec. 6, 1939, to Mar. 1 1 , 1940, 1019 visitors were taken 
through the Opera House. 19 states and 2 foreign countries 
were represented. 

From Mar. 12, 1940, to June, 15, 1940, 728 visitors were taken 
through the Opera House. 19 states and 7 foreign countries 
were represented. 

[15] 



1 



I 



f^v^.^^=^l 








^-fjm \ 


^^' 


J, 


/ -^.^^g^^StSB^A 




= - 







: il 


^P>^ 




■ i 







^\rT 



[16] 



p. p. I. E. TRUSTEESHIP 

Felloivship 
From funds left in trust upon the dissolution of the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition, a scholarship was established 
at the University of California. This Scholarship now embraces 
the Panama-Pacific International Exposition Memorial Fellow- 
ship in Pacific Coast History. The holder of the Fellowship for 
the past year has been Mr. John Denton Carter. 

Distribution of Sets of Todd's "Story of the P.P.I. E." 
During the past year fraternal organizations and public spir- 
ited citizens have been recipients of 51 sets of Todd's "Story of 
the Panama-Pacific International Exposition," while 28 sets of 
these books have been given to schools. 

WAR MEMORIAL GROUP 

Employments 
The War Memorial Department and the various tenants of 
our buildings employ a considerable number of San Francisco 
citizens. There are 1 19 regularly employed and 2 76 temporarily 
employed persons working in the Veterans' Building and the 
Opera House. These are divided as follows: 

Regular Employees 

Department employees 41 

Regular staff, Opera and Symphony 12 

San Francisco Museum of Art 24 

American Legion War Memorial 

Commission and allied groups 40 

Genealogical Library 2 

Total Regular Employees 119 

Temporary Employees 
Department, Orchestra, Chorus, Ballet, House Service and 
other temporary employees total 2 76; some employments lasting 
for a few months and others for a greater length of time. 

[17] 




[18] 



PERFORMANCES 

During the past year 132 performances were held in the Opera 
House, divided as follows: 

Opera performances 16 

Dollar opera 18 

Symphonies 31 

Concerts 23 

Graduations 13 

Lectures 11 

Ballet performances 7 

Civic celebrations 7 

Teachers' Institute sessions 3 

Benefit performances 3 

The 18th Grand Opera Season was an outstanding success. 
The repertoire was as follows: 

Marriage of Figaro. . .Mozart 

Lakme Delibes (2 performances) 

Der Rosenkavalier . . . .Strauss (2 performances) 

La Boheme Puccini (2 performances) 

Don Giovanni Mozart 

The Masked Ball Verdi 

Carmen Bizet (3 performances) 

Rigoletto Verdi 

Aida Verdi (2 performances) 

Manon Massenet 



Among the famous guest artists who appeared were: 

Lorenzo Alvary Verna Osborne 

Jussi Bjoerling Mona Paulee 

Margit Bokor Ezio Pinza 

Richard Bonelli Lily Pons 

John Brownlee Elisabeth Rethberg 

George Cehanovsky Bidu Sayao 

Alessio de Paolis Tito Schipa 

Raoul Jobin Suzanne Sten 

Alexander Kipnis Rise Stevens 

Marjorie Lawrence George Stinson 

Lotte Lehmann Thelma Votipka 

Francisco Naya Robert Weede 

[19] 




THE BRANGWYN MURALS 
AUDITORIUM, VETERANS BUILDING 



[20] 



Symphonies 

The Musical Association of San Francisco maintains the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra. The fall and spring symphony 
seasons annually bring to San Francisco the finest symphony 
music to be heard anywhere in the world, and our Opera House 
presents a magnificent setting for these presentations. This year 
there were presented, under the direction of Pierre Monteux, a 
total of 31 symphonies, at which 164 selections of the world's 
finest symphonic masterpieces were played. 



CONCESSIONAIRE 

The concessions in the Opera House have been managed by 
our Concessionaire, Mrs. Deborah C. O'Brien, in a most efficient 
manner. Mrs. O'Brien, under a new contract, has given splendid 
services to our patrons and has cooperated at all times with the 
management of the buildings. 



FINANCES 

Our net Department Budget for the fiscal year 1939-1940 
was $110,241. Pursuant to ordinance, our income requirements 
were $37,600. These income requirements were exceeded by 
$9,664.60, and a surplus of $13,375.95 was returned to the City 
Treasury. 

All of the recommendations contained in the Report of Past 
President Ralph J. A. Stern for the year 1939 were carried into 
effect by this Board, and their adoption has added greatly to the 
efficiency of our operation. 

[21] 



#^PW 




A CORNER Ol- THE GRAND FOYER, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 



[22] 



RECOMMENDATION 

It is the recommendation of your President that there be 
included in the Department Budget Request for the coming 
fiscal year an additional employee, to wit: a painter, for the 
purpose of keeping both buildings painted in order to prevent 
deterioration and to insure a generally presentable outlook of 
the buildings to the public. 

Upon the death of our former secretary, William C. Douglas, 
the Board, on May 16, 1940, appointed Mr. Ira G. Thompson 
as his successor. Fortunately for our Board of Trustees, Mr. 
Thompson, a World War Veteran and a man of experience in 
administrative affairs, fitted admirably into the position, plung- 
ing directly into the task of carrying on where "Bill" Douglas 
left off. 

Due to his diligence and grasp of the task, the work of the 
Board has moved on efficiently and smoothly, and I personally 
desire to pay a tribute of thanks and appreciation to Mr. Thomp- 
son for his splendid work. 

Our Managing Director, Mr. Selby Oppenheimer, although 

handicapped at intervals throughout the year by illness, has 

carried on and has cooperated with the Board. He has added 

another splendid year to his record in his able administration 

of this Department. 

Submitted, 

Judge Thomas M. Foley, 

President. 



i2?>-] 




H 



[24] 



BOARDS OF TRUSTEES 

of the 

WAR MEMORIAL OF SAN FRANCISCO 



1930* 
TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley James I. Herz James W. Mullen 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 

* Original Board, confirmed by Board of Supervisors, March 3, 1930. 



1931 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley James I. Herz James W. Mullen* 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



* James W Mullen died July 25, 1931. 



1932 
TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley* James I. Herz Harry A. Miltont 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 

* Robert I. Bentley died February 22, 1932. 

t Harry A. Milton confirmed January 18, 1932, vice James W Mullen, deceased. 

STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W C. Douglas, Secretary 

Appointed November 1, 1932 Appointed September 8, 1932 



1933 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. James I. Herz John A. McGregort 

Colbert Coldwell* Charles H. Kendrick Harry A. Milton 

Jesse C. Colman General Hunter Liggett Richard M. Tobin 

* Colbert Coldwell confirmed January 2, 1933, vice George Hearst, term expired. 
t John A. McGregor confirmed January 2, 1933, vice Robert I. Bentley, deceased. 

STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W C. Douglas, Secretary 



27} 



1934 
TRUSTEES 
K. R. Kingsbun-. President G^oree T Cameron. Vice-President 

Frank X. Belgrano. Jr. James I. Herz* John A. McGregor 

Colbert CoktweO Charles H. Kendrick Harr> A. Milton 

Jesse C. Cofanan General Hunter Liisgett Rkhard M. Tobin 

• James I. Herz resisned Febniar>-. 193-t. Col. \Vm. H. Tobin, U. S. A. Ret., confirmed 
March 5. 1934. xice James I. Herz. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenbeimer. Managimg Director W C. Douglas, Secretary 

1935 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kiiipbur>\* President Gee rare T Cameron.** Vice-President 

Frank N. BelgraDO, Jr. Charts H. Kendrick Allison E. SchofieWn 

Colbert CoMweD John A. McGregor Ralph J. .A. Sterut 

Hon. Thonus M. Folev"^ Harrv" .A. Mihon Col. Wm. H. Tobin 



* K. R. Kinssbur>- and George T Cameron resigned December. 1935. Joseph S. Thompson 

and J. H. ThrelkeW confirmed December 9. 1935. \ice K. R. Kingsbur>- and George T 

Cameron. respecti\-eh-. 
"^ Hon. Thomas M. Foky. Albson E. Scbofield and Ralph J. .\. Stem confirmed Januar> 

2&. 1935. \Tce General Hunter Liggett, Richard M. Tobin and Jesse C. Cohnan. respec- 

ti\-el>-. terms expired. 
t .\Dison E. Scbofield elected Vice-President May 2, 1935. 

ST.\FF 
Selby Oppenbeimer. Mamagixg Director W C. Douglas. Secretary 

1936 
TRUSTEES 
.\lli20n E. Scbofield. President J . H. ThretkeW.t Vice-President 

Frank X. Belgnuio, Jr. Charles H. Kendrick Ralph J. A. Stem 

Colbert ColdweD John A. McGregor Joseph S. Thompson 

Hon. Thomas M. Folex- Hzit\ A. Milton Co!. Wm. H. Tobin 



• Frank X. Belgrano. Jr„ resigned October. 1936. Ramsay Moran confirmed October 26. 

1936. vice Frank X. Belgrano. Jr. 
t J. H. Thrdkeld elected Vicc-Pnsadent March 19. 1936. - 

ST.AFF 
Selby Oppenbeimer, Mamaging Director W C. Douglas, Secretary 

1937 
TRUSTEES 
.Alfifon E. Scbofield, Presidemt J. H. Threlkeld. Vice-President 

Harold J. Bovd* Charles H. Kendrick Ramsay Moran 

Colbert CcMwem John .A. McGregor J Ralph J. A. Stem 

Hon. Thomas M. Folrv- Harr^- .A. Mihon Ccl. Wm. H. Tobin 



* Harold J. Boyd confirmed Januar>- 4. 1937. \-ice Joseph S- Thompson, term expired; 

resigned, June, 1937; John J. Suih>-an confirmed June :i. 193 7. vice Harold J. Boyd. 

* Colbert CoMweD resigned Juh-. 1937. Dr. .Alanson Weeks confirmed .August 2, 1937. 

\Tce Colbert ColdweD. 
$ John -A. McGregor resigned Febniar>. 1937. Horace B. Ctifton confirmed Febniar>- 8. 
1937, \Tce John .A. McGregor. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer. ifanaeing Director W. C. Douglas. Secretary 

[28] 



1938 
TRUSTEES 

J. H. Threlkeld, President Ralph J. A. Stern, Vice-President 

Horace B. Clifton Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Ramsay Moran Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Charles H. Kendrick* Allison E. Schoiield Dr. .^lanson Weeks 



Charles H. Kendrick resigned March, 1938. Frederick J. Koster confirmed .^pril 4, 1938, 
vice Charles H. Kendrick. 

STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director VV C. Douglas, Secretary 



1939 
TRUSTEES 
Ralph J. A. Stern, President Horace B. Clifton,* Vice-President 

Hon. Thomas M. Folevt Ramsay Moran J. H. Threlkeld 

Frederick J. Koster Allison E. Schofield Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan Dr. Alanson Weeks 



* Horace B. Clifton died October 25, 1939. 

t Hon. Thomas M. Foley elected Vice-President November 16, 1939. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 



1940 
TRUSTEES 
Hon. Thomas M. Folev, President Ramsav Moran, Vice-President 

Frederick J. Koster Ralph J. A. Stern J. H. Threlkeld 

Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan Col. Wm. J. Tobin 

Allison E. Schofield Dr. Alanson Weeks 

STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director 

*W. C. Douglas, Secretary, January 1, to April 30, inclusive 

Daniel P. O'Sullivan, Acting Secretary, May 1 to May 15, inclusive 

Ira G. Thompson, Secretary, appointed May 16, 1940. 



W C. Douglas died April 30, 1940. 



[29] 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES^^^^'^*' 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1941 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



WAR MEMORIAL 



OF 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January 8, 1^42 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Angelo J. Rossi 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 

Ramsay Moran, President 

Harry A. Milton, Vice'President 

Alvin Gerlack 

Frederick J. Koster 

Walter A. Leonetti 

C. A. Marckley 

GuiDO J. MUSTO 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

John J. Sullivan 

J. H. Threlkeld 

Col. William H. Tobin 



War Memorial Staff 
Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director 
Ira G. Thompson, Secretary to the Board 



San Francisco, California, 
January 8, 1942 
Honorable Angelo J. Rossi, Mayor, 

AND THE Board of Trustees of the 

War Memorial of San Francisco 
Gentlemen: 

As retiring President of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial of San Francisco, I submit herewith my report covering 
the activities of your Board, during the calendar year 1941. In 
addition to an account of the specific matters acted upon during 
my administration, I have included in the following pages certain 
historical and factual data with which you gentlemen are familiar, 
but which I hope will be of interest to any citi2,en who may wish 
more complete information about the origin of the War Memorial 
and its place in the civic life of San Francisco. 

We who are serving on the Board are fully conscious of our 
responsibilities as trustees of two great public buildings, erected in 
grateful and loving memory of those patriotic citizens of our city 
who died while serving with the armed forces of their country in 
past wars. Now that another conflict has been thrust upon us, we 
feel that the Veterans Building and the Opera House will not only 
continue to be symbols of those principles of justice, freedom and 
democracy which we are fighting to preserve, but may function 
actively, whether as headquarters or barracks, in any capacity 
requested by the military or civic authorities. 

To be President of your Board for the past year has been both 
an honor and a pleasure. The members of the Board have not been 
contented merely to have a title. They have assumed their duties 
eagerly, inteUigently and sincerely. While there have been differ- 
ences in opinion, any criticism has been constructive, with the re' 
suit that teamwork and efficiency in operations has been accom' 
plished. Although the scope of our problems, as compared with 
some other city commissions, may have been relatively modest, I do 
not hesitate to say, in complimenting the Board and thanking the 
members for their co-operation, that their service to their com- 
munity and to their trust has been unsurpassed. 

Sincerely, 

Ramsay Moran 

[7] 



PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 

1. BEGINNINGS 

The War Memorial consists of two edifices, the Veterans Build' 
ing and the Opera House, located on the west side of Van Ness 
Avenue, facing the City Hall, in the Civic Center of San Francisco. 
The total construction cost of these buildings was $6,250,000. 
The money was obtained from three sources: a bond issue of the 
City and County of San Francisco in the amount of $4,000,000, a 
municipal appropriation of $250,000 and public subscriptions 
totaling $2,000,000. The original Board of Trustees was appointed 
in 1930, and they carried the weighty responsibility of construe 
tion of the Memorial, with the many problems of allocation of 
funds, as between the facilities to be made available to the several 
groups who were recognized as the beneficiaries of the millions of 
dollars that had been so spontaneously raised by vote and donation 
of the citi2,ens of San Francisco. The buildings were completed 
and entered into civic service in 1932. 

As a substantial portion of the financing of the War Memorial 
was by subscriptions, large and small — which had been solicited 
as early as 1921 — it was agreed that the buildings would conform 
to the requirements of the three organi2,ations that had been spe' 
cifically mentioned as beneficiaries in the drive for funds in the 
1920's "to honor the memory of the soldiers, sailors, marines and 
Vv^ar workers — men and women — who brought imperishable glory 
to California by their splendid contribution to the winning of the 
World War."" The quoted words are from the agreement exe- 
cuted on August 19, 1921, between the Regents of the University 
of California and a committee of citi2,ens of San Francisco as 
trustees representing those interested in the plan of a War 
Memorial. In 1930, the City and County of San Francisco in 
effect accepted the assignment of the agreement and with it the 
responsibility of erecting the War Memorial and of carrying out 
not only the intent of the original donors but also of the citizens 
who had approved the additional funds necessary for the com' 
pletion of the project. 

[8] 



The three bodies which had an original priority that was recog- 
nized and confirmed in the final plans for construction and opera- 
tion were: ( 1 ) The San Francisco Posts of the American Legion; 
(2) The San Francisco Art Association; (3) The San Francisco 
Musical Association, which maintains the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. These organizations have continuously had a 
preferred status as to rental rates, quarters and datings. After the 
Opera House was opened a fourth organization was recognized as 
within the same category — The San Francisco Opera Association. 

While under the terms of the trust indenture the local posts of 
The American Legion are entitled to the use and occupancy of the 
meeting rooms, offices and auditorium of the Veterans Building 
rent free, it is further provided that they may extend similar privi- 
leges to other patriotic organizations. In order to administer the 
problems of allocation of space and internal management of the 
building the American Legion War Memorial Commission was 
set up in 1932. It is composed of nine members elected by the 
County Council of the American Legion. 

The Board of Trustees of the War Memorial is authorized by 
Section 44 of the Charter of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. It consists of eleven members appointed by the Mayor for 
terms of six years, and confirmed by the Board of Supervisors. 
The trustees serve without compensation. They are charged with 
the construction, administration and operation of the War 
Memorial and the grounds set aside therefor. They hold regular 
meetings on the second Thursday of each month in their meeting 
room in the Opera House. Starting with the first Board in 1930, 
the majority have always been veterans of World War I. While 
in earlier days there were considerable differences in viewpoint 
between the veteran and non-veteran members, I am happy to 
report that during the past year, and indeed for several years prior 
thereto, all distinctions between the two groups have disappeared 
and the Board has functioned with a common objective — ^the ef- 
ficient maintenance and management of both buildings. The per- 
sonnel of the Board since its inception will be found in Ap- 
pendix A. 

[9] 




[ 10] 



2 . THE BUILDINGS, THEIR FACILITIES AND USE 

The Veterans Building and The Opera House compose the 
War Memorial. On the fourth floor of the former is housed the 
San Francisco Museum of Art. A careful check of the traffic in 
these buildings shows that approximately 1,148,000 persons at' 
tended meetings, performances and exhibits in the War Memorial 
during 1941. A general description of the edifices and the public 
service that they render follows: 

(a) The Veterans Building. The first three floors of the Vet' 
erans Building are occupied and used by patriotic organi2,ations. 
Among its facilities are an Auditorium with a seating capacity of 
1106; a large number of offices occupied by the headquarters of 
various veteran groups; meeting halls; band practice rooms; a 
Men's Club Room and Women's Cocktail Lounge; the Green 
Room, handsomely furnished and functioning as a library and 
reading room; and a Trophy and Souvenir Gallery. 

A total of 174 veteran associations and units meet regularly in 
the Veterans Building. They include the American Legion and its 
Auxiliary, the Sons of the Legion, the United Indian War Vet- 
erans, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Gold Star Mothers, the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, the Disabled American 
Veterans of the World War, the Forty and Eight and Eight and 
Forty, the Jewish War Veterans, the Military Order of the Purple 
Heart, the United Veterans of the Republic, the United Spanish 
War Veterans, and scores of other well known organi2,ations. The 
California Society of The Sons of the American Revolution main- 
tains an excellent genealogical library of some 6,000 volumes as 
well as many old manuscripts, local histories and family records. 
It is open to the public and is frequently visited by students of 
early American history looking for source materials. 

During the year, 152 performances and attractions of various 
kinds were given in the Auditorium. They consisted of conven- 
tions, lectures, concerts and dances. On most of these occasions. 
The Auditorium was rented to non-veteran sponsors. The Amer- 
ican Legion War Memorial Commission, by arrangement with 
our Board, retains the major portion of the rent charged and pays 

[11] 



to us a sum sufficient to cover the cost of light, heat and janitorial 
service employed by reason of each engagement. 

But the rooms used by the largest number of persons, — prac 
tically all of them veterans or their affiliates — are the meeting halls. 
During 1941 there were 4544 scheduled meetings. While no at' 
tempt was made to keep an accurate record of attendance, a con' 
servative estimate would be that at least 455,000 people entered 
the Veterans Building for this purpose alone. 

Adding to this figure the hundreds of persons employed daily 
in the various unit headquarters, the large number of veterans 
using the Club Room and Green Room and over 115,000 in at' 
tendance at the Auditorium performances, it is safe to state that 
the traffic in this portion of the building comes to about 570,000 
visitors per year. These figures are given primarily to underline 
the fact that the inevitable wear and tear on the facilities of the 
building caused by such a concourse of people brings about many 
problems of upkeep and replacement of equipment with which the 
Board is concerned. The same problems arise, in a somewhat lesser 
degree, in the Opera House. 

(b) The San Francisco Museum of Art. This progressive 
institution occupies the top floor of the Veterans Building. It is 
the museum of the San Francisco Art Association, and under the 
able directorship of Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley has become 
one of the leading centers of artistic education in the country. As 
an indication of its importance in its field, it may be noted that out 
of town newspapers and periodicals of national circulation devoted 
some 6,000 inches of space to its activities during the year. 

Over 120 exhibitions of various types were held during 1941. 
They included contemporary painting, sculpture, prints, drawings, 
photography, and decorative arts and combined to furnish a very 
complete survey of modern developments. About 147,000 citi2,ens 
made use of the museum and approximately 8,000 children at' 
tended special courses in the appreciation of art. An outstanding 
collection of books on art is available to students and research 
workers in the museum library. 

The museum has made available to San Francisco residents the 
v/orks of masters, old and new. But more than that, the wise 

[12] 



diffusion of its activities in artistic education, under a competent 
staff, has brought it nation'wide recognition and has advertised a 
rebirth of the city's cultural leadership dating from the opening of 
the War Memorial. 

(c) The Opera House. This is the only municipally owned 
opera house in the United States. Its seating capacity is 3,252. It 
is not only attractive architecturally and in its interior decorations, 
but the technical resources of its stage and the spacious and com- 
modious dressing rooms available for the use of both stars and 
chorus make it the most up-to-date edifice of its kind in the world. 
Nor has the convenience of the public been overlooked. As one 
indication of public service I may cite the fact that several hundred 
outlets for hard-of-hearing aids have been installed throughout the 
house and hearing-aid headsets may be used by patrons without 
charge. Thus full enjoyment of any performance may be had by 
those who may be handicapped by defective hearing. 

The Opera House is one of San Francisco's show places. We 
maintain a guide there, Mr. Julian Bagley. Always courteous and 
accommodating, and with a wide knowledge of the building's facil- 
ities and history, he shows groups of visitors through the house 
daily. They totaled over 3,300 during the year, and came from all 
over the United States as well as several foreign countries. They 
included many distinguished personages in the realm of music as 
well as scores of high school students who inspected the Opera 
House as part of their cultural education. 

In the Trustees' Room is an official guest book which all of the 
artists who have appeared in the Opera House for several years 
past have signed. It contains an imposing roll of the world's great 
singers, musicians and lecturers and is one of the most valued pos- 
sessions of our Board. Arrangements are now under way to place 
in some suitable location bound volumes containing the programs 
of all performances held in the Opera House since its opening. 
They tell a story of artistic triumphs and of unsurpassed cultural 
opportunities offered to the public of San Francisco. 

We have afforded to the San Francisco Opera Guild the use of 
one of the rooms off the grand foyer for a musical reference 
library. On the upper floors the San Francisco Opera Association 

[13] 




A CORNER OF THK (IRAND FOYHR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 



[14] 



and the Musical Association of San Francisco have their offices. 
In the basement is a well equipped emergency hospital, with a 
registered nurse in attendance during all performances. A number 
of minor ailments, such as fainting, headaches and indigestion were 
taken care of during the year. 

In 1941 the Opera House was rented 141 times, with an 
aggregate attendance of about 423»,000 people. Among the 
leading artists whom they enjoyed were the violinists Yehudi 
Menuhin, Mischa Elman and Jascha Heifitz; the pianists Arthur 
Rubenstein and Vladimir Horowitz,; the concert singers Marian 
Anderson, Gladys Swarthout and John Charles Thomas. Other 
notable events were the lectures delivered by H. V. Kaltenborn, 
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Dorothy Thom.pson; the concert 
of sacred music under the sponsorship of the San Francisco Con' 
ference of Christians and Jews; the recital by the Don Cossack 
Chorus; the British War Relief Show in which the star was the 
famous English comedienne Gracie Fields; the series of perform- 
ances by the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and the very creditable 
annual spring season of the San Carlo Opera Company. 

The two regularly established and outstanding musical offerings 
of the year were the concert series of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra and the Grand Opera season. The Symphony, under 
the capable and inspired conductorship of Pierre Monteux, is 
recognized as one of the world's finest organizations of its kind. 
The large attendance at its Friday afternoon and Saturday evening 
performances evidenced the eager response of San Franciscans to 
the opportunity to hear symphonic masterpieces played by master 
musicians. 

The season of grand opera produced by the San Francisco Opera 
Association was, as usual, the artistic apogee of the year. The 
famous guest stars, as well as the high quality of the chorus, 
ballet, stage direction and orchestration gave assurance that we 
need not leave the city limits to find the finest operatic perform- 



[15] 



ances available anywhere. The season's repertoire, stars and con- 
ductors follow: 

DON PASQUALE (Donizetti) with Salvatore Baccaloni, Bidu 
Sayao, John Brownlee. 

Gennaro Papi, Conducting. 
DER ROSENKAVALIER (Strauss) with Lotte Lehmann, Rise 
Stevens, Alexander Kipnis, Margit Bokor, Irra Petina, 
Walter Olitzki, Karl Laufkoetter. 

Erich Leinsdorf, Conducting. 
DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT (Donizetti) 2 perform- 
ances with Lily Pons, Raoul Jobin, Irra Petina, Salvatore 
Baccaloni. 

Gennaro Papi, Conducting. 
LA TOSCA (Puccini) with Stella Roman, Charles Kullman, 
John Brownlee, Salvatore Baccaloni. 

Gaetano Merola, Conducting. 
MADAME BUTTERFLY (Puccini) 2 performances with Licia 
Albanese, Frederick Jagel, Irra Petina, John Brownlee, 
Lorenzo Alvary, George Cehanovsky. 

Gennaro Papi, Conducting. 
BARBER OF SEVILLE (Rossini) 3 performances with Bidu 
Sayao, Lawrence Tibbett, Salvatore Baccaloni, Ezio Pinza, 
Irra Petina. 

Gaetano Merola, Conducting. 
TANNHAUSER (Wagner) 2 performances with Stella Roman, 
Lauritz Melchior, Julius Huehn, Alexander Kipnis, Anthony 
Marlowe. 

Erich Leinsdorf, Conducting. 
CARMEN (Bizet) with Gladys Swarthout, Raoul Jobin, Robert 
Weede, Licia Albanese, Thelma Votipka, George Cehan' 
ovsky. 

Erich Leinsdorf, Conducting. 
LOVE OF THREE KINGS (Montemezzi) with Grace Moore, 
Charles Kullman, Ezio Pinza, Robert Weede. 
Italo Montemezzi, Conducting. 
SIMON BOCCANEGRA (Verdi) with Lawrence Tibbett, 
Stella Roman, Frederick Jagel, Ezio Pinza, Thelma Votipka, 
John Brownlee. 

Erich Leinsdorf, Conducting. 
RIGOLETTO (Verdi) with Lawrence Tibbett, Lily Pons, Jan 
Peerce, Lorenzo Alvary, Irra Petina, George Cehanovsky. 
Gennaro Papi, Conducting. 

[16] 



3 . PERSONNEL OF THE BOARD 

At the end of 1940 the terms of three members of the Board 
expired. They were retiring President Thomas M. Foley, Ralph 
J. A. Stern and Allison E. Schofield. All had carried out their 
duties, during six years, conscientiously and well. All had been 
appointed as representatives of veteran bodies. All of them be 
heved and so indicated to the Mayor, that other capable veterans 
should be aiforded the opportunity of serving on the Board, in 
line with the policy of rotation in office announced by the County 
Council of The American Legion. 

Mayor Rossi, acceding to their wishes, and acting upon the 
recommendation of veteran leaders, appointed three new trustees: 
Alvin Gerlack, Edward Sharkey and Claudius A. Marckley. A 
vacancy existed on the Board which had not been filled since the 
death of Horace B. Clifton in 1939. In his place the Mayor ap' 
pointed Guido J. Musto. After only a few days in office Mr. 
Sharkey resigned, and his place was taken by Walter A. Leonetti, 
also a veteran. In February, Dr. Alanson Weeks resigned because 
his office hours made it very difficult for him to attend our after' 
noon meetings. By his resignation the Board lost a forthright and 
clear thinking member. Fortunately, however, the Mayor reap' 
pointed in his place Ralph J. A. Stern, whose constructive sugges- 
tions in the past had been the starting points of many improve 
ments and embellishments in the War Memorial. It is regrettable 
that his continued illness has deprived us of the counsel of 
Trustee J. H. Threlkeld. 

During the year we have tried to function more precisely than 
before through committees. The responsibilities of each committee 
have been definitely defined and so far as possible matters coming 
within their jurisdiction have been immediately forwarded to them 
by the office so that they would be in a position to present their 
reports at the next meeting of the Board. All committees have 
fulfilled their assignments and have aided in speeding up the busi' 



[17] 



ness of the Board. At the beginning of the year, five standing 

committees were appointed, as follows: 

Budget and Finance: Milton, Chairman; Sullivan and Weeks 
Art: Koster, Chairman; Gerlack and Tobin 
Opera and Symphony: Musto, Chairman; Koster and Weeks 
Veterans: Marckley, Chairman; Leonetti and Sullivan 
Buildings: Tobin, Chairman; Gerlack and Musto 

As President, I instituted the practice of having regular office 
hours in our office at the Veterans Building between four and five 
o'clock each Tuesday. I believe that this practice should be con- 
tinued at whatever hours may be convenient for the incoming 
President — for the following reasons: The responsibilities of ad' 
ministering a six million dollar investment are great. While ques' 
tions of policy are for the Board as a whole, many matters arise in 
the intervals between our monthly meetings which should not be 
left to the sole discretion of the office staff, however competent it 
may be. In accepting the honor and authority of the chairmanship 
of the Board, one must assume the responsibility of looking and 
listening. By this I mean looking at the plant under our charge, 
inspecting new installations and spots where repairs may be 
needed, and seeing that jobs ordered are properly completed. By 
listening I mean hearing the reports and suggestions of the Manag' 
ing Director and the Secretary regarding rental applications, em- 
ployee personnel, finances, public relations, correspondence and a 
number of other details and making, if necessary, a decision. With 
a full-time paid staff and a board of laymen who meet only once 
a month, there is the apparent danger that the former will become 
much more familiar with the practical operation of building man- 
agement than their employers. This condition should not arise and 
may be prevented, in the most co-operative spirit, by members of 
the Board, and particularly the President, devoting regular hours 
to the task of supervision. I take pleasure in reporting that during 
my term, several members of the Board have spent many hours in 
familiarizing themselves with the property under their charge. 



[ 18] 



4. OFFICE STAFF AND OTHER EMPLOYEES 

The office staff of the War Memorial is composed of a Manag' 
mg Director, a Secretary and a Clerk-Stenographer. On January 
1 1941, our first Managing Director, who had been appointed in 
1932 and had carried out his duties faithfully and with distinction, 
passed away. Selby C. Oppenheimer was noted throughout music 
circles of America as an impresario. He could call many great 
artists his intimate friends. He reached the objective which he 
was chosen to attain — to establish the Opera House as the dwell' 
ing place of artistic perfection. Yet he was activated more by 
common sense than by the proverbial artistic temperament. When 
he died the members of the Board realizied that they had lost not 
only a trusted employee but also a sincere friend. The following 
resolution was adopted unanimously: 

''Whereas, Selby C. Oppenheimer was appointed on No- 
vember 1, 1932 as the first Managing Director of the War 
Memorial of San Francisco, and served in that capacity until 
his untimely death on January 1, 1941 ; and 

Whereas, during the intervening years he was charged, 
under successive Boards of Trustees, with the operation and 
management of the War Memorial Opera House and Vet' 
erans Building; and 

Whereas, his wide background of experience in the pro' 
duction of opera and concerts enabled him to make contacts 
and procure engagements that filled our Opera House with 
the leading artists of the world, so that its reputation as the 
home of fine music is unsurpassed; and 

Whereas, his general disposition and sympathetic point of 
view and his unwavering honesty and sincerity ot purpose 
enabled him to understand and solve the many problems of 
management involving the veteran, art, symphony and opera 
groups occupying the buildings; and 

Whereas, his conscientious attention to his duties, day and 
night, was responsible in great measure for the public recog' 
nition of these buildings as centers of culture and comrade 
ship; 

[19] 



Therefore, Be It Resolved by the Board of Trustees of the 

War Memorial of San Francisco, in regular meeting as' 

sembled, that we mourn the passing of a faithful official and 

warm friend, and that we offer our heartfelt condolence to 

his widow, Blanche Oppenheimer, who so devotedly shared 

his love, companionship, and artistic hfe." 

Friends of Mr. Oppenheimer provided for a bronze plaque com- 

m.emorating his years of service which was placed appropriately 

in the Trustees' Room of the Opera House, beside the tablet con' 

taining the names of the original Board of Trustees who appointed 

him as Managing Director. 

It was a difficult task to find a new Managing Director. Mr. 
Oppenheimer had fulfilled his mission of raising the War Memo- 
rial to the top of the list of institutions wherein, in addition to the 
facilities for the comradeship of war veterans, the best in opera, 
symphony, concerts, ballet and art could be found. It was no 
longer necessary to cajole artists to appear in our Opera House — 
to the contrary, it was sometimes embarrassing to allocate datings 
among those whose primary objective in a visit to the Pacific Coast 
was to have a booking there. The Grand Opera season and the 
Symphony series were established features. But the buildings were 
now nine years old, and had undergone more than their fair share 
of wear and tear. The major concern of our Board for the im- 
mediate future, therefore, was for building maintenance. The 
prospective fulfillment of this requirement weighed heavily in our 
choice of a new Managing Director. 

For a brief period following Mr. Oppenheimer's death, our 
Secretary, Ira G. Thompson, was Acting Managing Director. 
Meanwhile, applications for the new opening, written and verbal, 
backed by recommendations from a variety of sources, poured in. 
Ten individuals let it be known formally that they wanted the 
job. All were qualified for some phases of the position, but by the 
very nature of the ramifications of the directorship, none had the 
experience to fill immediately all of its requirements. The Board 
examined all applications carefully and conscientiously and finally 
selected by unanimous vote Mr. Edward Sharkey, who has served 
as Managing Director since January 17, 1941. 

[20] 



Mr. Sharkey undertook a difficult assignment. Having held 
high offices in The American Legion, he understood thoroughly 
the sometimes delicate problem of relationship between the Board 
and the various veteran organi2;ations living in the Veterans Build' 
ing. His contact with the other regular tenants of the War Memo' 
rial was a new venture. His knowledge of the particular routine 
of our office necessarily had to be acquired by practice and obser- 
vation. His prior experience in the practical aspects of building 
construction and maintenance gave him a good foundation for the 
most important category of his new responsibilities. 

I am glad to report that throughout the year, our Managing 
Director has made every effort to learn his new duties and to carry 
them out and has, measured by the relatively short time available, 
succeeded remarkably well. Insofar as the upkeep of the buildings 
is concerned — which has been emphasi2,ed as his chief responsi' 
bility — he has accomplished a first rate job. It has been my obser- 
vation that he has maintained cordial relationships with the repre- 
sentatives of the opera, symphony, art and veteran beneficiaries of 
the War Memorial, while at the same time upholding the policies 
and enforcing the regulations of our Board regarding these and 
other tenants. His supervision of our employees has been sound 
and has heightened their morale. He has been wise in consulting 
our Secretary, Mr. Thompson, on various problems of internal 
management that have arisen. 

There is room for Mr. Sharkey's improvement in his approach 
to certain aspects of office routine. Moreover, it must not be for- 
gotten that the executive officer of our Board should not allow 
himself, notwithstanding past prominence, to be drafted into 
public appearances on behalf of veteran or other groups, whereby 
what he may do or say may carelessly be taken to reflect the 
opinion of the Board that employs him. However, the practical 
and diplomatic sides of the Managing Director's task cannot be 
mastered in a day or even a year. Mr. Sharkey has successfully 
passed a probationary term and I can and do commend him for a 
sincere and loyal attitude and a job well done. 

Our Secretary, Mr. Ira G.Thompson, has continued to function 
efl^ectively, not only on his own assignment, but also as a pinch 

[21] 



hitter. During the last tew months of 1940, while Mr. Oppen- 
heimer was ill, Mr. Thompson assumed a double burden. This 
extra load of duties was carried into the opening months of 1941, 
giving our new Managing Director the opportunity to survey and 
appraise his responsibihties. Mr. Thompson is not only an expert 
accountant and secretary, but his initiative and interest in the 
problems, large and small, that must be solved day by day, have 
attained for him an accurate factual background for convenient 
office use, and a sound judgment on matters of policy which should 
be of constructive assistance both to our incoming President and 
our Managing Director. 

The remaining member of our staff is Mr. Daniel P. O'Sullivan, 
technically classified as clerk-stenographer. He has fulfilled both 
roles of this dual category cheerfully and v^ell. 

We have 39 other permanent employees, — janitors, elevator 
operators, watchmen, engineers, electricians, a window cleaner, an 
elevator mechanic, a stage carpenter, a stage property man, a 
painter and an opera house guide. The painter was finally given 
to us in the current budget, after several years of pleading before 
the Board of Supervisors. The money he saves us in preserving 
and redecorating our plant is worth several times his annual wages. 
We need extra janitors- — at least two — for whom we have asked 
in vain for several years. The square foot area which our janitors 
are required to clean is substantially in excess of that in the typical 
down'town office building, and the staggered hours which matinee 
and evening performances force us to observe enhance the diffi' 
culties and increase overtime work. 

The morale of the employees has improved during the last year. 
In the past there had been an excessive turnover in personnel, par' 
ticularly among the janitors. This was attributable to a misunder' 
standing of the Board's policy regarding overtime, promulgated in 
line with regulations of the Civil Service Commission and now 
straightened out, together with the inevitable odd hours which had 
to be worked because of afternoon and evening performances and 
the opportunity of more attractive working hours in other city 
departments. However, during the year with the co-operation of 
the Managing Director and Mr. John McGuire, our Foreman 

[ 22 ] 



Janitor, we have established a better working schedule and have 
stabili2,ed our janitorial personnel. 

Several of the other employees on our payroll are expert tech- 
nicians in their respective trades, and their skill and experience 
have been important factors in building maintenance and in back 
stage perfection in Opera House performances. 

5. REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

At every meeting of our Board, a substantial portion of the 
agenda consists of a report and discussion on jobs on order, under 
way, and completed. We have in our charge an investment of 
over six million dollars in buildings which are used, day and night, 
more than any other public buildings in San Francisco. They must 
inevitably deteriorate. It is our task, within the Hmits of the funds 
made available to us, to see that the Veterans Building and the 
Opera House do not degenerate into shabbiness or drabness, but 
maintain, functionally and in appearance the usefulness and dig' 
nity for which they were designed. There are many things which 
should be done, in the name of sound business management if 
nothing else, which are beyond our reach. But as an indication of 
what we have been able to accomplish during the past year, I list 
the following examples: 

For the Veterans Building, an awning, similar to that in front 
of the Opera House, was installed before the main entrance; the 
walls and fixtures of most of the rooms were washed by a W.P.A. 
crew; all of the skylights were thoroughly cleaned; the drapes in 
the meeting halls were renovated; ventilating fans were installed 
in the Clubroom and Cocktail Lounge. 

In the Opera House, the main valance curtain and the ornamen' 
tation over the proscenium arch were cleaned for the first time 
smce the building opened; showers were built in both the men's 
and women's chorus rooms; new rubber matting was laid in the 
outer foyer; the main switchboard was rewired and adjusted; the 
orchestra pit and the symphony set were repainted and the standee 
space in the rear of the orchestra section was redecorated; the 
galleries backstage were cleaned and storage conditions of stage 
properties corrected, thereby eliminating a fire hazard. 

[23] 



For the bcnetit of both buildings, sidewalks around the Memo- 
rial were repaired: additional units were added to our flood light' 
ing program; a serious water seepage in the tunnel connecting the 
buildings and in both basements was controlled: changes were 
made in our electrical connections to ehminate a portion of the 
standby load, thus saving about $60.00 per month during the oif 
season: the parking lanes in the rear of both buildings were relined 
and renumbered; scores of minor repainting and replastering jobs 
were completed; a floor cleaning machine was purchased to ac 
complish a more thorough job of scrubbing and polishing the floors 
of both buildings. 

The above recites merely the highlights. There were actually 
dozens of other jobs completed of equal importance in maintaining 
the Memorial in proper condition. It is a truism to say that labor 
and materials cost money. These jobs cost plenty of money. Some 
of it came out of our current budget, but for a large portion of the 
expense we had to resort to our War Memorial Reserve Fund. 

This fund is authorized by an ordinance passed in 1939 appro- 
priating an amount equal to 1 5 ^'/c of the annual revenue derived 
from the use of the Opera House and Veterans Building for neces- 
sary improvements, additions, and reconstruction, and replace- 
ments due to physical and functional depreciation. During the 
current fiscal year we have expended or committed the major por- 
tion of this fund — about $6200. 

But there is still much to be done. The inevitable tendency, 
both on the part of the Board and of the budget controlling au- 
thorities in the City Hall is to take the attitude that if money is 
not available in current appropriations for the department, at least 
we have an ace in the hole in the reserve fund. But that fund was 
never intended to be drawn on for expenditures involving ordinary 
upkeep and repairs. It was essentially and solely set up to provide 
for capital improvements and replacements. As each year passes, 
the time approaches when the depreciation on these buildings, if 
they are to maintain the standard of serviceability for which they 
were dedicated, must be offset by dollars put to work and not just 
written off on paper. 

[24] 



In fact, the time has now arrived when the War Memorial must 
deteriorate in appearance and usefulness unless it has more funds. 
I reali2;e fully that we are at war and that there are more important 
demands upon both governmental and private resources. But I 
recommend as a principle of sound management and maintenance 
that when peace is restored, if not sooner, the unencumbered share 
of our revenue going to our reserve fund be increased from 1 5 % 
to 25%. In keeping our War Memorial wholesome, active and 
intact perhaps we may rededicate and reconsecrate it in memory 
also of those who will lay down their lives for their country in this 
great renewal of the war we failed to finish. 

6. REVENUES AND INCOME 

Our ordinary operating expenses are provided for in the annual 
mAinicipal budget adopted by the Board of Supervisors. For the 
current fiscal year of 19414942, this appropriation was $133,' 
271.00. The chief items covered by it are salaries, wages, heat, 
light and power, materials and supplies, equipment and services 
of other departments. But by no means all of this sum is paid out 
of tax revenues. All of our income from rentals goes to the city 
treasury and offsets, by the amount collected, the total appropria' 
tion. As this fiscal year is not yet completed, the amount of our 
current earnings is not available. During the year ending June 
30, 1941, however, we took in $50,862.74. Our budget for that 
period was about the same as this year; our expenditures exceeded 
our revenues by approximately $82,000. (See Appendix B.) It 
is both interesting and startling to note that this figure represents 
less than one and one-third per cent of the money invested in our 
plant. We do not feel, therefore, that in maintaining and preserv 
ing the War Memorial on such a slim margin we have been 
burdensome to the tax paying public. 

By far the larger portion of our earnings come from rentals of 
the Opera House. Other sources are payments by the concession' 
aire who operates the Opera House buffet, and service charges 
received for use of the Veterans Auditorium. Notwithstanding 
the fact that over 90% of our earned income is derived from the 
Opera House, the Board has been careful in authori2;ing expendi' 

[25] 



tures to divide all available moneys equitably between the two 
buildings, so that practically the same amount is spent annually on 
the upkeep of both buildings. 

In making our annual budget requests to the Mayor and Board 
of Supervisors we have never asked for more than we believed was 
actually needed, and we never have received as much as we asked 
for. In the coming year there will undoubtedly be curtailment in 
appropriations due to emergency expenditures necessitated by the 
war. But in my opinion it would be a short sighted policy to cut in 
any respect the funds appropriated for the current year. To the 
contrary they should be modestly increased. It is to be expected 
that not so many shows and concerts will be given in the coming 
months, so that our rental revenues will be materially decreased. 
The cost of materials and supplies of all kinds has gone up. Yet 
the buildings will be used more than ever before not only by 
veteran organi2,ations but very possibly by civic and military au- 
thorities. The facilities which they offer, appropriate for many 
uses in war as well as in peace, should be maintained in proper 
condition . 

We administer also a trust fund donated to us by the directors 
of the Panama Pacific International Exposition, held in 1915, upon 
the dissolution of that corporation. The principal of this fund 
amounts to $15,000.00. It has been invested with expert advice, 
in bonds which bring a return of $597.50 per year. A list of the 
securities will be found in Appendix C. 

By the terms of the trust this fund is employed to support a 
Fellowship in Pacific Coast History at the University of Cah' 
fornia. A new student, selected by the University Regents, is ap- 
pointed each year, and he is required to write a thesis on some 
aspect of international expositions. Mr. John Denton Carter held 
the fellowship for the term ending June 30, 1941, and he presented 
a most interesting paper on "Aviation at the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition." He describes in detail the then astounding 
plan to promote a round-the-world aerial race to advertise the 
exposition, which was frustrated only by the outbreak of World 
War I. The daring of our present day warriors of the air is 
equalled only by the imagination and intrepidity of those aviation 

[26] 



pioneers of 1914. The holder of the Fellowship for 19414942 is 
Mr. Hugh Taylor. 

We also have acquired from the Panama'Pacific International 
Exposition a number of sets of Todd's official five volume history 
of the Exposition, some of which are distributed yearly to inter' 
ested students and libraries. In addition, we have under our charge 
forty murals originally hung in the exposition buildings. Many of 
them have been loaned to various schools and other institutions 
and eight of them, by Brangwyn, constitute the chief decorative 
motif of the walls of the Veterans Auditorium. 

7. RENTAL RATES AND POLICIES 

The rates which we charge for use of the Opera House have 
become stabilised through a close adherence to the schedule 
adopted by this Board two years ago. It sets up standard rentals 
for grand opera, symphonies, general commercial uses, fraternal 
meetings, school programs, civic celebrations, and engagements for 
charitable purposes. Two amendments to this resolution were 
adopted during the year — one allowing a $250 basic charge per 
performance when the same tenant gives ten or more perform^ 
ances during a fiscal year, the other extending the flat $200 rate 
allowed the Young People's Symphony to include also grand opera 
for the benefit of students sponsored by the San Francisco Opera 
Guild. 

Under our resolution, special rates may be made only upon a 
proper showing that the requested use has not been contemplated 
or described in the several classifications listed above. Our strict 
adherence to this rule was illustrated by the fact that only half a 
do2,en engagements out of 141 held during the year were granted 
special rates. Among them were such worthy causes as the free 
concert of sacred music given by the San Francisco Conference of 
Christians and Jews, the Red Cross Roll Call, and "The Wizard 
of Ord" a show put on by the enlisted men from Fort Ord. There 
will be an increasing demand for special concessions, but in my 
opinion we should continue to be careful not to break down our 
rate structure. 

[27] 



Long ago the Board established the poHcy of staying out of 
competition with our legitimate down town theaters. This policy 
also should be continued. While an exact formula cannot be set 
up, we should not book plays, dramas or musical shows that ordi- 
narily would be housed elsewhere. Nor is the Opera House, with 
a few possible exceptions when no other accommodation is avail' 
able, the place for convention meetings. An informal approach 
was made during the year by interested parties to have us induce 
conventions here by making special low rates. But after proper 
explanation, this effort to misuse the Opera House was abandoned. 

We are not quite in the same position as other municipal boards 
who have the administration of public buildings under their juris- 
diction. We are not only managers, but trustees as well, and there- 
fore obligated to see that this War Memorial is put to no use 
repugnant to the trust agreement which played so large a part in 
its creation. Therefore we have the right, and have exercised it on 
occasion, of refusing the use of the Opera House for events which 
however praiseworthy they may be in other surroundings, do not 
fit into the War Memorial plan of operation. 

In this connection an incident arose during the year which 
caused considerable puWicity in the local press. We refused the 
application of the Town Hall Forum of the West made in the 
month of August, for a reservation in the month of January, 1942 
for a debate between two prominent lecturers on the question 
"It Can Happen Here," which admittedly would be a discussion 
of whether or not a dictatorship would be established in this 
country. We were waited upon among others, by a representative 
of The American Civil Liberties Union, who charged us with 
discrimination, censorship and dictatorship. 

After a full hearing, the Board unanimously reaffirmed its 
position. Aside from the fact that several private theaters and 
auditoriums were available for this debate, I believe that as your 
President I voiced the unanimous sentiment of the Board when I 
told the delegation at our meeting that the controlling reason for 
our action was that ''a debate on whether or not there can be a 
dictatorship in this country — a debate to be held next January 
when this country may be in the war — is not a proper subject for 

[28] 



a civic Opera House built for and dedicated to the veterans of the 
last war." 

January came and with it a new war against dictatorships and 
in my opinion the soundness of our judgment is best demonstrated 
by an appreciation of what might have happened in the Opera 
House if the contemplated debate had been allowed. 

The Board took another firm stand on a matter of policy during 
the year. We received a request from the Musicians Union that 
we enforce a regulation that all music used in conjunction with 
any entertainment held in the War Memorial be furnished either 
by members of that Union or by those holding permits from it. 
We told the Union that we hired no musicians ourselves and that 
we would not impose upon our tenants the closed shop as a pre- 
requisite to the use of the War Memorial. 

8. CONCLUSION AND APPRECIATION 

It has been my duty and pleasure during the year to contact 
the officers of various organi2,ations with which our Board does 
business. I have found their attitude to be one of consistent co' 
operation in maintaining the buildings on the high standard which 
we all have set for them. 

The American Legion War Memorial Commission has been 
particularly co-operative this last year. It has held to strict ac- 
countability those few individuals and organizations who through 
carelessness and wantonness have damaged property and fixtures 
within the Veterans Building. It has at its own expense, installed 
exhaust fans for the ventilation of the Clubrooms and has em- 
ployed a special policeman to regulate parking in the rear of the 
building. A spirit of mutual respect and helpfulness between our 
two Boards has been engendered. I present my compliments to the 
Commission and to Dr. Charles Kleupfer, its chairman, and Mr. 
W. B. Dorsett, its general manager. 

Mr. Robert Watt Miller, President of the San Francisco Opera 
Association and Mr. Paul Posz, its Business Manager, in a number 
of conferences throughout the year, have given every indication of 
their desire to achieve smoother teamwork in the daily operations 
in which we are so closely connected. They have recognized our 

[29] 



problems of finance and upkeep as we have recognized theirs, and 
I am sure that we start the new year with a clearer understanding 
of our respective responsibilities. The concessions in the Opera 
House, under contract to Mrs. Deborah C. O'Brien, have been 
operated in a courteous and capable manner. 

As President of The Musical Association of San Francisco, 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby has made many constructive sug- 
gestions in connection with facilities and stage settings used for 
concerts by the Symphony Orchestra. She has carried out a big 
assignment graciously and well. 

Mr. Arthur Brown, Jr., the well known architect, has been 
kind enough to give us his time in connection with several matters 
during the year in which we needed his expert advice. 

I have already mentioned the able administration of the San 
Francisco Museum of Art by Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley. 

In conclusion, I give my most cordial thanks to the members 
of the Board, all of whom have cooperated fully and inteUigently 
in our common eifort to do a good job. To my successor as Presi- 
dent, Mr. Harry A. Milton, now the oldest member in years of 
service on the Board, I extend my congratulations. I know he will 
be captain of a fine team. 

Sincerely, 

Ramsay Moran 

President 

Januarys, 1942 



[30] 



APPENDIX A 

BOARDS OF TRUSTEES 

of the 

WAR MEMORIAL OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1930* 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley James I. Herz James W. Mullen 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



Original Board, confirmed by Board of Supervisors, March 3, 1930. 



1931 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. King.sbury, President George T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hearst General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley James I. Herz James W. Mullen* 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



James W. Mullen died July 25, 1931. 

1932 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, Preside?!! George T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. George Hear.«t General Hunter Liggett 

Robert I. Bentley* James I. Herz Harry A. Miltonf 

Jesse C. Colman Charles H. Kendrick Richard M. Tobin 



* Robert I. Bentley died February 22, 1932. 

f Harry A. Milton confirmed January 18, 1932, vice James W. Mullen, deceased. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

Appointed November 1, 1932 Appointed September 8, 193 2 



1933 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury, President George T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. James I. Herz John A. McGregorf 

Colbert Coldwell* Charles H. Kendrick Harry A. Milton 

Jesse C. Colman General Hunter Liggett Richard M. Tobin 



'''Colbert Coldwell confirmed January 2, 1933, vice George Hearst, term expired, 
t John A. McGregor confirmed January 2, 193 3, vice Robert I. Bentley, deceased. 

STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer, Managi7tg Director W. C. Douglas. Secretary 

[31] 



1934 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury. President George T. Cameron, Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano. Jr. James I. Hcrz* John A. McGregor 

Colbert Coldwell Charles H. Kendrick Harry A. Milton 

Jesse C. Colman General Hunter Liggett Richard M. Tobin 



James I. Herz resigned February, 1934. Col. Wm. H. Tobin, U. S. A. Ret., con- 
firmed March 5, 1934, vice James I. Herz. 
STAFF 

Selby Oppenheimer. Ma»iaging Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1935 

TRUSTEES 

K. R. Kingsbury,* President George T. Cameron,* J Vice-President 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. Charles H. Kendrick Allison E. Schoficld f t 

Colbert Coldwell John A. McGregor Ralph J. A. Stern f 

Hon. Thomas M. Foleyf Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 



* K. R. Kingsbury and George T. Cameron resigned December, 1935. Joseph S. 
Thompson and J. H. Threlkeld confirmed December 9, 1935, vice K. R. Kings- 
bury and George T. Cameron, respectively. 

t Hon. Thomas M. Foley, Allison E. Schofield and Ralph J. A. Stern confirmed 
January 28, 1935, vice General Hunter Liggett, Richard M. Tobin and Jesse C. 
Colman, respectively, terms expired. 

J Allison E. Schofield elected Vice-President May 2, 1935. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer. MdJiagirig Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1936 
TRUSTEES 
Allison E. Schofield, President J. H. Thrclkeld.f Vice-Pre<:ident 

Frank N. Belgrano, Jr.* Charles H. Kendrick Ralph J. A. Stern 

Colbert Coldwell John A. McGregor Joseph S. Thompson 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 



Frank N. Belgrano, Jr., resigned October, 1936. Ramsay Moran confirmed October 

26. 1936, vice Frank N. Belgrano, Jr. 
J. H. Threlkeld elected Vice-President March 19, 1936. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1937 
TRUSTEES 
Allison E. Schofield, President J. H. Threlkeld, Vice-President 

Harold J. Boyd* Charles H. Kendrick Ramsay Moran 

Colbert Coldwell f John A. McGregor % Ralph J. A. Stern 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Harry A. Milton Col. Wm. H. Tobin 



* Harold J. Boyd confirmed January 4, 1937, vice Joseph S. Thompson, term eX' 

pired; resigned, June, 1937; John J. Sullivan confirmed June 21, 1937, vice 

Harold J. Boyd, 
t Colbert Coldwell resigned July, 1937. Dr. Alanson Weeks confirmed August 2, 

1937, vice Colbert Coldwell. 
J John A. McGregor resigned February, 1937. Horace B. Clifton confirmed FebrU' 

ary 8. 1937. vice John A. McGregor. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

[32] 



1938 
TRUSTEES 
J. H. Threlkeld, President Ralph J. A. Stern, Vice-President 

Horace B. Clifton Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley Ramsay Moran Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Charles H. Kendrick* Allison E. Schofield Dr. Alanson Weeks 



* Charles H. Kendrick resigned March, 1938. Frederick J. Koster confirmed April 4, 
1938. vice Charles H. Kendrick. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer. Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1939 
TRUSTEES 
Ralph J. A. Stern, President Horace B. Clifton,* Vice-President 

Hon. Thomas M. Foley f Ramsay Moran J. H. Threlkeld 

Frederick J. Koster Allison E. Schofield Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan Dr. Alanson Weeks 



* Horace B. Clifton died October 25, 1939. 

t Hon. Thomas M. Foley elected Vice-President November 16. 1939. 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director W. C. Douglas, Secretary 

1940 
TRUSTEES 
Hon. Thomas M. Foley, President Ramsay Moran, Vice-President 

Frederick J. Koster Ralph J. A. Stern Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

Harry A. Milton John J. Sullivan Dr. Alanson Weeks 

Allison E. Schofield J. H. Threlkeld 

STAFF 
Selby Oppenheimer, Managing Director 
*W. C. Douglas, Secretary, January 1, to April 30, inclusive 
Daniel P. O'Sullivan, Acting Secretary, May 1 to May 1 5, inclusive 
. Ira G. Thompson, Secretary, appointed May 16, 1940. 



* W. C. Douglas died April 30, 1940. 

1941 
TRUSTEES 

Ramsay Moran, President Harry A. Milton, Vice-President 

Alvin Gerlack* C. A. Marckley** John J. Sullivan 

Frederick J. Koster Guido J. MustoJ j. H. Threlkeld 

Walter A. Leonettif Ralph J. A. Stern§ Col. Wm. H. Tobin 

* Alvin Gerlack confirmed December 30, 1940, vice Thomas M. Foley, term expired 

January 2. 1941. 
t Walter A. Leonetti confirmed January 13, 1941, vice Edward J. Sharkey, resigned. 
** C. A. Marckley confirmed December 30, 1940, vice Allison Schofield, term expired 

January 2, 1941. 
t Guido J. Musto confirmed December 30, 1940, vice Horace B. Clifton, deceased. 
§ Ralph J. A. Stern confirmed February 17, 1941, vice Dr. Alanson Weeks, resigned. 

Edward J. Sharkey confirmed December 30, 1940, vice Ralph J. A. Stern, term 

expired January 2, 1941. Edward J. Sharkey resigned January 12, 1941. Dr. 

Alanson Weeks resigned February 16, 1941. 

STAFF 
'■• Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director, appointed January 17, 1941. 

vice Selby Oppenheimer. 
t Ira G. Thompson, Secretary. 



* Selby Oppenheimer died January 1, 1941. 

t Ira G. Thompson, acting managing director, January 7, 1941 through January 16, 
1941. 

[33] 



APPENDIX B 



WAR MEMORIAL OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Statement — Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Fiscal Year 1940-41 



REVENUES: 

Basic Rentals 

Percentage above basic rentals. 

Rehearsals 

Oificc Rentals 

Concessions 

Vending Machines (pro-rated) 
Service Charges 





Opera 


Veterans 


■ 


Total 


House 


Building 


Museum 


$ 3 5,97^.00 


$35,975.00 


$ 




4,243.97 


4,243.97 






5 50.00 


5 50.00 






2, 400. Of) 


2,400.00 






.3.291.20 


3,291.20 






5 1.07 


23.49 


27.58 




4,351.50 




4,351.50 




$ 50,862.74 


$46,483.66 


$ 4,379.08 





EXPENDITURES: 

Personal Services : 

Permanent $ 84,299.99 

Temporary 6,440.59 

Wages 1,712.50 

Contractual Services 2,160.23 

Materials and Supplies 4,902.22 

Services of Other Departments 5,867.73 

Scavenger Services 400.20 

Maintenance of Fire Alarm . . . 780.00 

Electricity and Gas 20,127.59 

Equipment 1 96.03 

Reserve Fund expenditures. . . 6,325.85 

Settlement Pub. Liability claim 275.00 



$133,487.93 



$33,353.98 


$43,998.85 


3,459.47 


2,552.84 


1,700.00 


12.50 


1,13 3.77 


^)37.3 3 


2,745.56 


1,650.95 


3,806.84 


2,060.89 


200.10 


200.10 


528.00 


252.00 


7,817.13 


5,5 54.63 


45.80 


150.23 


2,396.50 


3,929.35 




275.00 


$57,187.15 


$61,574.67 


$118,761.82 



Expenditures exceed revenues. $ 82,625.19 $10,703.49 $57,195.59 $14,726 1 
$ 82,625.19 $67,899.08 $14,726 1 



[34] 



APPENDIX C 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 
MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 

Bond No. Name of Bonds Int. Rate Maturity Par Value 

6212 Pacific Gas ^ Elec. Co 3/2?^ 6/1/66 $ 1,000.00 

6213 Pacific Gas L^ Elec. Co 3!/29f 6/1/66 1,000.00 

586 California Water Service... 4 % 5/1/61 1,000.00 

4280 California Water Service. .. 4 % 5/1/61 1,000.00 

8715 Consumers' Power Company 3|/2/t 11/1/67 1,000.00 

8716 Consumers' Power Company 3/2% 11/1/67 1,000.00 

1317 City of Vernon 4%% 10/1/44 1,000.00 

1318 City of Vernon A%^,t 10/1/44 1,000.00 

1772 So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal. . . 4 ^r 4/1/50 1,000.00 

2278 So. Pacifies. F. Terminal. . . 4 ^r 4/1/50 1,000.00 

8937 Calif. Toll Bridge Auth.. . 4 ^t 9/1/76 1,000.00 

189 Emporium-Capwell Co. . . . 4 % 1/1/52 1,000.00 

806 Emporium-Capwell Co. .. . 4 % 1/1/52 1,000.00 

1319 City of Vernon 4%^^ 10/1 '44 1,000.00 

730^ City of New York 3/2 9c r/1'54 750.00 

1 1 1 City of New York 3/2% ?/l/54 250.00 

$15,000.00 



C3n 



PRFNTED BY 
PERNAU-WALSH PRINTING CO. 
755 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



P^BUC Lli3RARY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



£942 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



WAR MEMORIAL 



OF 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January i^, ig^^ 



:iTY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Angelo J. Rossi 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 



Harry A. Milton, President 

C. A. Marckley, Vice-President 

Alvin Gerlack 

Charles B. Kleupfer* 

Frederick J. Koster** 

Walter A. Leonetti 

Felix S. McGiNNisf 

Ramsay Moran J 

GuiDO ]. MUSTO 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

John J. Sullivan 

J. H. Threlkeld 

Col. William H. Tobin 



^Confirmed vice Moran, Sept. 24, 1942. 
'*Resigned Sept. 21. 1942. 
fConfirmed vice Koster. Sept. 24, 1942. 
JRcsigncd Sept. 21. 1942. 



War Memorial Staff 
Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director 
Tra G Thompson, Secretary to the Board 



San Francisco, California, 
January 14, 1943. 

Honorable Angelo J. Rossi, Mayor, 
AND THE Board of Trustees of the 
War Memorial of San Francisco. 

Gentlemen: 

As the retiring President of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial of San Francisco, I submit herewith my report of the 
business transacted by the Board and a resume of the Depart- 
ment's activities during the past year. 

It is a privilege to serve on this Board as a trustee for these 
magnificent buildings, v^hich vv^ere erected to the memory of those 
who died while serving in the armed forces of our country. To 
have been selected as President of this Board is an honor which 
I will long remember and a memory I will always cherish. 

The history and origin of the War Memorial have been 
written into the record by the reports published in prior years. 
I will, therefore, confine my report to the business which was 
transacted during my term as President. I desire to express my 
gratitude to the members of the Board, to our Managing Direc- 
tor, to the Secretary to the Board and to our General Clerk, 
for the splendid cooperation accorded me during the past year. 

Sincerely, 

Harry A. Milton. 

My report follows: 



[7] 



Committee Assignments, Calendar Year 1942, 

Budget and Finance: 

Vice-President C. A. Marckley, Chairman 
Trustee Ralph J. A. Stern 

Trustee John J. Sullivan 



Art Association : 
Trustee 

Trustee 

Trustee 
Trustee 



Frederick J. Koster, Chairman 

(Jan. 'Sept., Incl.) 
Col. William H. Tobin, Chairman 

(Oct.'Dec, Incl.) 
Alvin Gerlack 
Felix S. McGinnis. apptd. Oct. 8, 1942 



Opera and Symphony: 

Trustee Guido J. Musto, Chairman 

Trustee Alvin Gerlack 

Trustee FeHx S. McGinnis, apptd. Oct. 8, 1942 

Trustee Ramsay Moran (Jan. 'Sept., Incl.) 

Trustee Ralph J. A. Stern 



Veterans: 

Trustee 
Trustee 

Trustee 
Trustee 



Ramsay Moran, Chairman (Jan. 'Sept., Incl.) 
Charles B. Kleupfer, Chairman 

(Oct.'Dec, Incl.) 
Walter Leonetti 
John J. Sullivan 



Buildings: 
Trustee 
Trustee 
Trustee 



Col. William H. Tobin, Chairman 
Alvin Gerlack 
Ralph J. A. Stern 



[9] 



WAR MEMORIAL DEPARTMENT 
EMPLOYMENT 

The War Memorial Department, and the various tenants of 
the two buildings, provide employment for a considerable number 
of San Francisco citizens. 

There are regularly 121 and temporarily 28') employees, segre' 
gated as follows: 

Department employees 42 

Regular Staff of Opera and Symphony 15 

Art Museum 22 

The American Legion War Memorial Commission 

and aUied groups 40 

Genealogical Library 2 

Total Regular Employees 121 

Temporary Employees divided among 
Orchestra 
Chorus 
Ballet 

House Service 
Other Temporary Employees 285 

Some of this temporary employment lasts for a few months 
and some during a greater portion of the year. 

I did not continue the practice of keeping office hours in our 
office in the Veterans' Building, as had been recommended by 
Mr. Ramsay Moran in his Report for 1941, because I am of the 
opinion that such a practice is of no value to the War Mc 
morial, that it interferes with the usual routine of the office and 
that it is assuming the duties that rightfully belong to the Man' 
aging Director. When questions of policy arise, the president 
and a majority of the members of the Board have always been 
contacted and they render the necessary decisions. This is the 
procedure followed by all other departments of the City govern- 
ment. 

[10] 



The office staff of the War Memorial is composed of a Man' 
aging Director, a Secretary to the Board and a General Clerk' 
Stenographer. Their duties are as prescribed by the Civil Service 
Commission and set forth by the Commission in the "Classiiica' 
tion of Duties of Positions in the Municipal Service." We should 
abide by these rules. Mr. Edward J. Sharkey has served as Manag' 
ing Director since January, 1941. He is a most competent execu' 
tive, and the duties of managing the War Memorial should be left 
to him alone, as this is obviously the only practical way in which 
the War Memorial buildings can be operated. He is fully capable 
of discharging the duties of his ofHce, and this is solely his respou' 
sibility under the rules of the Civil Service Commission. 

Mr. Ira G. Thompson has been the Secretary to the Board 
since May, 1940. He is an experienced accountant and an able 
secretary. 

Mr. Daniel P. C Sullivan has served as General Clerk'Stenog' 
rapher since May, 1937. He is highly efficient in this position. 
On occasions he has substituted for Secretary Thompson, and 
has performed the secretarial duties in a satisfactory manner. 

There are 39 other permanent employees in the Department, 
as follows: 1 Stage Carpenter, 1 Stage Electrician, 1 Stage 
Property Man, 1 Chief Engineer, 2 Watch Engineers, 1 Elec 
trician, 1 Elevator Mechanic, 1 Foreman Janitor, 18 Janitors, 1 
Window Cleaner, 5 Watchmen, 4 Elevator Operators, 1 Painter 
and 1 Opera House Attendant, part time. 

In the Report of the previous year (1941) there appears this 
statement — and I quote: "During the year, 152 performances 
and attractions of various kinds were given in the Auditorium 
(of the Veterans' Bldg.). They consisted of conventions, lee 
tures, concerts and dances. On most of these occasions the Audi' 
torium was rented to nou'Veteran sponsors. The American 
Legion War Memorial Commission, by arrangement with our 
Board, retains the major portion of the rent charged and pays to us 
a sum sufficient to cover the cost of light, heat and janitorial 
service by reason of each engagement." This statement is inac' 

[11] 




A (.oiiNLR ()[■ I hi: (;kani) kjyer, war memorial opera house 



f 12] 



curate. The rental of the Auditorium for non- Veteran affairs is 
set at $80.00. The Commission pays out of this sum, $50.00 to 
this Board and retains $30.00. When Veteran organi2,ations use 
the Auditorium they are charged $1.50. I am calling this to the 
attention of die Board at this time in order to place it in the 
record, so that the above statement may be corrected. 

The relationship existing between the tenants of the War 
Memorial buildings and the Board of Trustees during the past 
year has been most pleasing and harmonious. The relationship be- 
tween the Trustees and the employees of the War Memorial De- 
partment has, at no time, been more satisfactory than that rela- 
tionship existing during the past year. The morale of the em- 
ployees has been brought up to that point necessary to maintain 
efficient operations. The relationship between the Board and the 
various Labor Unions has, during the past year, been extremely 
harmonious. It is a pleasure to report that it was not necessary at 
any time for any of the representatives of the various Unions to 
appear before either our Managing Director or the Board of 
Trustees as a result of some grievance on the part of our em- 
ployees. This, of course, reflects great credit upon the manner in 
which the personnel of the War Memorial have been handled by 
our Managing Director. 

OPERA HOUSE 

During the past year the Opera House was used 143 times for 
public presentations. This represents an approximate attendance 
of a half million people. No previous opera season has been 
more outstanding than the one immediately passed. This in spite 
of the many difficult and complex problems arising because of 
wartime conditions. The world's greatest artists, participated in 
15 performances of grand opera, presented in a manner unsur- 
passed in any part of the world. This gave to the citi2,ens of San 
Francisco a season of the firiest opera ever enjoyed here. 



[13] 



Repertoire and artists of the 1942 Grand Opera Season 

AIDA (Verdi) with Stella Roman, Bruna Castagna, Frederiek 
Jagel, Rc^bert Weede, Ezio Pinza, Lorenzo Alvary. 

Gaetano Merola, C'ondiieting. 
THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT (Donizetti) with 
Lily Pons, Irra Petina, Raoul Jobin, Salvatore Baccaloni, 
Lorenzo Alvary, George Cehanovsky. 

Pietro Cimara, Conducting. 

LA TRAVIATA (Verdi) with Bidu Sayao, Thelma Votipka, 
Jan Peerce, Richard Bonelli, George Cehanovsky, Alessio 
DePaolis, Douglas Beattie, Lorenzo Alvary. 

Gaetanc^ Merola, Conducting. 

THE BARTERED BRIDE (Smetana) with Josephine Antoine, 
Charles Kullman, Marek Windheim, Douglas Beattie, 
Thelma V^otipka, George Cehanovsky, Lorenzo Alvary. 

Walter Herbert, Conducting. 

LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR (Donizetti) with Lily Pons, Jan 
Peerce, Richard Bonelli, Alessio DePaolis, Lorenzo Alvary, 
Thelma Votipka. Pietro Cimara, Conducting. 

CARMEN (Bizet) with Irra Petina, Licia Albanese, Raoul 
Jobin, John Brownlee, Thelma Votipka, Christina Carroll, 
Alessio DePaolis, George Cehanovsky, Lorenzo Alvary. 

Gaetano Merola, Conducting. 

FAUST (Gounod) Licia Albanese, Charles Kullman, Ezio Pinza, 
John Brownlee, Olive Ponitz, Thelma Votipka, George 
Cehanovsky. Fausto Cleva, Conducting. 

LOVE OF THREE KINGS (Montemezzi) with Jean Tennyson, 
Ezio Pinza, Robert Weede, Charles Kullman, Alessio De' 
Paolis. Italo Montemezzi, Conducting. 

FLEDERMAUS (J. Strauss) with Marek Windheim, Margit 
Bokor, Josephine Antoine, Arra Petina, Charles Kullman, 
Douglas Beattie, John Brownlee, Lorenzo Alvary. 

Walter Herbert, Conducting. 

THE MASKED BALL (Verdi) Frederick Jagel, Richard 

Bonelli, Stella Roman, Bruna Castagna, Josephine Antoine, 

Lorenzo Alvary, Douglas Beattie. 

Fausto Cleva, Conducting. 
BARBER OF SEVILLE (Rossini) Bidu Sayao, Irra Petina, 

Charles Kullman, Ezif) Pinza, John Brownlee, Salvatore 

Baccaloni. 

[14] 



COQ D'OR (RimskyKorsakov) Josephine Antoine, Salvatnre 
Baccaloni, Olive Ponitz, Alessio DePaolis, Douglas Beattie, 
Thelma Votipka. 

The great conflict in which these United States have been en' 
gaged for the past year brought about the use of the Opera 
House on many occasions for the presentation of patriotic pro' 
grams. Groups representing the various Allied nations availed 
themselves of the use of this splendid edifice to sponsor programs 
tending toward promoting better understanding and mutual help- 
fulness with our allies. A very large number of the personnel of 
our armed forces attended various performances, thereby adding 
color and stimulating a greater war effort on the part of our 
citizenry. 

The Opera House has been ''blacked'Out'\ a procedure adopted 
to assure the safety of the patrons should any incident occur; 
this with the approval of the Civilian Defense authorities. As an 
additional safeguard, trained air-raid wardens are on duty during 
each performance. 

A large number of tourists and many local residents visit the 
War Memorial buildings and are taken on a tour by a competent 
guide. 

VETERANS^ BUILDING 

The four floors devoted to offices, meeting rooms, clubrooms, 
auditorium and other facilities serve approximately 183 organi- 
zations of Veteran groups. It is estimated that three-quarters of 
a million persons annually make use of this building's facilities. 
Day and night, numerous activities in the building attract large 
groups of citizens. 

ART MUSEUM 

Art lovers have recognized the extraordinarily fine museum 
which occupies the 4th floor of the Veterans' Building. Approxi- 
mately a quarter of a million people have availed themselves of 
the splendidly lighted and equipped galleries of the museum dur- 
ing the past year. 

cm 




[ 16] 



REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

War Memorial of San Francisco 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements, 

Fiscal Year 1941-42 



Total 



Opera 
House 



Veterans' Art 

Building Museum 



REVENUES: 

Basic rentals $ 31,200.00 

Percentage above basic rentals 1,960.18 

Rehearsals 250.00 

Office Rentals 2,400.00 

Concessions 3,33 5.80 

Vending machines (pro-rated) 44.74 

Service charges 6,669.00 

Totals $ 45,859.72 



31,200.00 


$ 


1,960.18 




250.00 




2,400.00 




3,33 5.80 




24.09 


20 65 




6,669.00 



$39,170.07 $ 6,689.65 



EXPENDITURES: 

Personal services : 

Permanent $88,218.14 $34,775.19 $46,365.45 5 7,077.50 

Temporary 7,326.41 3,536.91 3,256.86 532.64 

Wages 2,540.00 1,195.50 1,344.50 

Contractual services 1,517.07 583.07 934.00 

Materials and supplies 5,190.37 2,527.82 1,934.06 728.49 

Services of other departments 3,766.15 1,917.03 1,849.12 

Scavenger services 420.24 210.12 210.12 

Maintenance of fire alarm 780.00 528.00 252.00 

Electricity and gas 18,945.82 7,436.70 5,430.38 6,078.74 

Equipment 91.37 45.69 45.68 

Reserve fund expenditures... 8,229.59 3,699.43 4.106.90 423.26 

Totals $137,025.16 $56,455.46 $65,729.07 314,840.63 

$122,184.53 

Expenditures exceed revenues $ 91,165.44 $17,285.39 $59,039.42 $14,840.63 

$ 76,324.81 



[17] 



REPAIRS 

A list oi the important repairs and improvements during 1942 
lollows: 

The Clubroom and Ladies' Lounge of the Veterans' Building 
were painted and refinished; 

The walls and eeiling of Room 1, Veterans' Building were 
painted: 

The stage floor of the Opera House was sanded and refinished; 

The executive office, Room 110 Veterans' Building, was 
painted and refinished; 

A wood-and'glass partition was installed in our executive office 
to provide some degree of privacy for our Managing 
Director and also for members of the Board who have 
occasion to visit that office from time to time; 

Debris remaining from the original construction was removed 
from the grids and structural beams backstage in the 
Opera House; 

Outlet holes were drilled and drain pipes installed in the tun' 
nel between the Veterans' Building and the Opera House 
so that the water seepage conditions could be better con' 
trolled; 

The molding and doors in the Veterans' Auditorium were 
regilded; 

The light standards in the Memorial Court, and the lighting 
in many parts of both buildings were changed so as to 
comply with the '"dim-out" regulations as promulgated by 
the United States Army, this work being approved by the 
Civilian Defense authorities. There were several other 
emergencies brought about by war conditions but, for' 
tunately, these were anticipated by the Managing Di' 
rector and the necessary steps were prepared for them in 
advance. 

A source of worry has been the priority rulings for the pro' 
curement of materials, as established by the Federal govern- 
ment. Just prior to the opening of the opera season it was found 

[18] 



that the awning for the front of the Opera House had deterio' 
rated and was practically unusable. Because of the great distance 
between the curb and the entrance doors it would have been 
impossible to use these doors without a considerable amount of 
inconvenience to the patrons. Upon endeavoring to have the 
awning recovered, it was found that priority regulations greatly 
endangered the possibility of having the work done; however, our 
Managing Director, Mr. Sharkey, proved himself equal to the 
occasion and continued his efforts until he succeeded in having 
the awning recovered before the beginning of the opera season 
and before any inconvenience was suffered by the patrons be' 
cause of inclem.ent weather, thus averting any adverse criticisms. 

CONCLUSION 

It has been my pleasure during the year to have visited the 
officers of the various organii^ations with which our Board does 
business. I have found them to be most cooperative in maintain' 
ing the buildings on the standards which have been established 
by the Board of Trustees. At no time in the history of the War 
Memorial has the American Legion War Memorial Commission 
been more cooperative. It has established and adhered to a high 
standard of efficient operation in the portions of the premises 
under its jurisdiction. The Commission has, at its own expense, 
caused many improvements to be made, thereby adding to the 
comforts of the Veterans and others using the Veterans' Build' 
ing. A most splendid spirit of understanding and cooperation 
between the American Legion War Memorial Commission and 
the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial has been engen' 
dered, and this, beyond question, is both mutually advantageous 
and satisfactory. 

I extend my most cordial thanks to the members of this Board 
for their splendid cooperation and help to me during my term of 
office. To my successor as president, Mr. Claudius A. Marckley, 
1 extend my hearty congratulations. I know that he will be a 
most capable president. 

Sincerely, 
Harry A. Milton, Fresidtfut. 



[ 19 ] 



i 



APPENDIX 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 

Bond No. Name ot Bonds Int. Rate Maturity Par Value 

6212 Pacific Gas 6? Elec. Co 3/2% 6/1/66 $1,000.00 

6213 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3/2% ^ 6/1/66 1,000.00 

586 California Water Service. . 4 % 5/1/61 1,000.00 

4280 California Water Service . . 4 % 5/1/61 1,000.00 

8715 Consumers Tower Company ^Vz^/c 11/1/67 1,000.00 

8716 Consumers' Power Company 3]/2% 11/1/67 1,000.00 

1317 City of Vernon 4%9f 10/1/44 1,000.00 

1318 City of Vernon 43^9^ 10/1/44 1,000.00 

1772 So. Pacific'S. F. TerminaL . 4 % 4/1/50 1,000.00 

2278 So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal. . 4 '/r 4/1/50 1,000.00 

8937 Calif. Toll Bridge Auth.. . . 4 % 9/1/76 1,000.00 

189 EmporiunvCapwcll Co. ... 4 % 1/1/52 1,000.00 

806 Emporium-Capwell Co. ... 4 % 1/1/52 1,000.00 

1319 City of Vernon 4%% 10/1/44 1,000.00 

730^- City of New York 3/2% 5/1/54 750.00 

1 1 1 City of New York 3/2% 5/1/54 250.00 

$15,000.00 



r2(»] 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1945 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



WAR MEMORIAL 



OF 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January 13, 1944 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Angelo J. Rossi 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 



C. A. Marckley, President 

GuiDO J. MusTO, Vice-President 

Sidney M. Ehrman 

Alvin Gerlack 

W. A. Henderson* 

Dan S. Hewitt 

Charles B. Kleupfer** 

Walter A. Leonetti 

Felix S. McGinnis 

Harry A. Milton 

' Ralph J. A. Stern 

John J. Sullivan! 



'■'Confirmed vice Chas. B. Kleiipfer, Dec. 13, 1943. 
**Resigned and reconfirmed vice John J. Sullivan, Dec. 13, 1943. 
fResigned September 17, 1943. 



War Memorial Staff 

Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director 

Ira G. Thompson, Secretary to the Board 



San Francisco, California, 
January 13, 1944. 

To His Honor, the Mayor of San Francisco, 

AND TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE WaR 

Memorial of San Francisco: 

Another year has ended and the stewardship of the Trustees 
must again be recorded. This being our final meeting and in 
keeping with the custom estabhshed by my predecessors, I here- 
with submit my concluding report as president of this Board. 

It is with pride and great pleasure that I take this opportunity 
of recounting to you, Honorable Mayor, to the members of the 
Board of Trustees of the War Memorial and to the citi2;enry of 
San Francisco, through the medium of this report, the wonder- 
ful accomplishments of the War Memorial buildings. To put 
into writing the history and real purpose for which these build- 
ings were erected would be a sacrilege on my part, although the 
past-presidents whom I have succeeded have, most ably and elo- 
quently, through their annual reports, repeatedly eulogized the 
purpose of these, the world's most beautiful War Memorial 
buildings, which San Francisco has the honor of possessing. 

To one who has been privileged to serve in the armed forces 
of his country, I have always felt, upon entering either of these 
buildings, as though I were walking on sacred ground, and at 
times while within these portals have felt the nearness of my 
comrades who have gone on before. San Francisco is truly 
blessed, and its citi2;ens should be very proud, indeed, of these 
magnificent monuments, dedicated to our boys who have given 
their all. 

To have served as president of this Board of Trustees has been 
to me a rare privilege, a pleasure and a distinct honor. To the 
members of the Board — each and every one — -I wish to express 



deep and grateful appreciation for their splendid cooperation and 
the sincerity with which they have discharged the duties which 
they have been called upon to perform. This, I feel, is sufficient 
proof that the members of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial are fully aware of their responsibilities. The year just 
past has been most harmonious and successful in accomplish- 
ments. The Board has at all times worked in complete unity, re- 
gardless of which group they may represent, all realizing the 
necessity of the work which must be completed with harmony 
and cooperation for the best interests of all. 

Very sincerely, 

Claudius A. Marckley. 



WAR MEMORIAL TENANTS 

The relationship between the Art Association, represented 
by Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley; Tobias Bricca and Bruce 
Jones, chairman of The American Legion War Memorial Com' 
mission; Mr. Kenneth Monteagle, president of the San Fran' 
Cisco Opera Association, and Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
president of the Musical Association of San Francisco, has been 
most satisfactory. Each group is to be highly commended for 
their wonderful cooperation. Especially must I compliment the 
War Memorial Commission of The American Legion for the 
generous manner in which they have assisted financially, when' 
ever possible or necessary, in various improvements so vitally 
needed in the Veterans' Building. 



MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES 

The record of achievements has been recorded and com' 
mented upon by my predecessors concerning the office staff of 
the War Memorial, particularly the office of Managing Di' 
rector. This, to me, is of vital importance and should be called 
to the attention of all concerned. The success and widespread 
reputation which the San Francisco War Memorial buildings 
received under the guidance and direction of our late and greatly 
beloved Managing Director, Selby C. Oppenheimer, was one 
most worthy of imitation and so difficult to duplicate. However, 
at this writing it really affords me much pleasure and satisfac 
tion to make the following statement. When Mr. Edward 
Sharkey assumed the office of Managing Director three years 
ago, all were much concerned as to just how successful this as' 
signment would be to one starting from "scratch"- — one who 
had not acquired through many years of actual directorship the 
necessary experience for this all-important post. However, I, 



7} 



for one, had a warm conviction from the start in the wisdom of 
Mr. Sharkey's appointment, knowing full well his indefatigable 
will to surmount difficult obstacles. After reviewing his accom- 
plishments, it has become a proven fact to me and to all of the 
Board members, that all of the problems, great or small with 
which he has been confronted, whether coming from the world 
of music, opera, art or Veteran relationships, have been most 
successfully handled and brought to satisfactory conclusion. Mr. 
Sharkey has made every effort to please, at the same time diplo' 
matically handling some of the most trying situations, brought 
about by those w'ho would endeavor to use our buildings for 
purposes unbecoming their dignity. This has relieved the Board 
of many controversial subjects at our meetings and during the 
interim. A great bond of friendship, cordiality and goodwill 
has been developed, and the operation of both buildings has 
never been more successful. This is an accomplishment most 
worthy of commendation, and is greatly appreciated by the 
Board. Let me be very frank and say that the Board is very 
fortunate in having one so faithful and efficient in his duties. 

Mr. Ira Thompson, the Secretary of the Board of Trustees, 
has performed his duties in a dignified and satisfactory manner 
at all times, carrying out to a successful conclusion his assign- 
ments. 

Mr. Daniel P. O'Sullivan, the office clerk-stenographer, has, 
as in the past, proven a most valuable asset in keeping the 
records of the Board in a splendid manner. 

The relationship between management and employees has 
been most harmonious, and I do wish to express to Mr. John 
McGuire, our Foreman Janitor, our appreciation for his splendid 
cooperation in getting things accomplished, regardless of employ- 
ment problems which are so trying during this present war 
crisis. 




[9] 



BOARD COMMITTEES, 1943 

The members of the Board were assigned to live standing com' 
mittees, set up as follows: 

Budget and Finance: 

Trustee Kleupfer, Chairman 

Trustee Ehrman 

Trustee Hewitt 

Trustee Milton 

Art Association: 

Trustee McGinnis, Chairman 
Trustee Ehrman 
Trustee Leonetti 
Trustee Stern 

Opera and Symphony: 

Vice-President Musto, Chairman 
Trustee Ehrman 
Trustee McGinnis 
Trustee Stern 

Veterans: 

Trustee Gerlack, Chairman 

Trustee Hewitt 

Trustee Kleupfer 

Trustee Leonetti 

Trustee Sullivan (to 9/19/43) 



1 



B 



uildings: 



Trustee Sullivan, Chairman (to 9/17/43) 
Trustee Milton 
Vicc'President Musto 

Through this method of procedure, the Trustees are made ac 
quainted with all of the responsibilities connected with the op' 
eration of the War Memorial. 

[10] 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

In compliance with all the rules and regulations established 
by Army and Civilian Defense programs for the safeguarding 
of lives and property in the event of an air attack on our City, 
every precaution was entered into to secure the safety of our 
buildings and their occupants. A considerable amount of money 
was expended to meet every requirement of the Civilian Defense 
regulations. The ''black'out" costs were as follows: 

Total O.H. V.B. 

War Memorial Funds: 

Work Order 351 $ 426.76 $426.76 

Work Order 366 51.83 $ 51.83 

Work Order 370 284.90 284.90 

Work Order 376 122.44 122.44 

Black-out paint 11.33 5.66 5.67 

Mayor's Emergency Fund.. 1,691.43 1,691.43 

Totals $2,588.69 $2,156.26 $432.43 

Employees of the Department have completed one or more 
courses of the following Civilian Defense programs: 
Air Raid Warden Service 
Theatre Air Raid Warden Service 
Building and Plant Protection 
War Gases 
Red Cross First Aid 

This cooperation on the part of our employees we heartily 
appreciate, and each one is to be commended for his loyal and 
patriotic spirit. 

MAJOR REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

The Managing Director constantly inspects and where repairs 
or improvements are needed they are called to the attention of 
the Board members at our monthly meetings, or sooner if urgent, 
and, if possible and within the scope of our financial allocations 
or budget, corrections are made. There are many repairs and 

[11] 



improvements which I shall not list or indicate. I wish to say, 
however, that our War Memorial buildings have not been al- 
lowed to deteriorate; in fact, they still continue to be one of San 
Francisco's outstanding attractions. 

The following are the important repairs and improvements of 
this year: 

Scaling and painting of all steel sash on second floor of the 
Veterans' Building and the Opera House; 

Refinishing of the foyer of the Veterans' Auditorium; 
Repair of the "Gold Curtain", Opera House; 

Scaling and repainting of metal marquee over the taxi ramp, 
south side of the Opera House; 

Recovering of the sidewalk canopies, Van Ness Avenue en- 
trance to the Veterans' Building and limousine entrance to the 
Opera House; 

New flooring installed in Room 1, Veterans' Building; 

Refinishing and painting of foyer, street entrance to the Art 
Museum; 

Sanding and refinishing of the oak floor, basement of the 
Opera House; 

Painting and refinishing of offices assigned to the Art Mu' 
seum on the main floor of the Veterans' Building. 

OPERA HOUSE 

The Opera House has enjoyed one of its most outstanding 
years, as indicated from the record of attendance, performances, 
visitors and miscellaneous activities. The record is as follows: 

Attendance: 

Performances 419,250 

Visitors 3,010 

Miscellaneous Activities 1,200 

Total Attendance 423,460 

[12] 



Performances: 

Grand Opera 17 

Symphony Concerts 31 

Concerts, Opera Assn. Concert Div 21 

Miscellaneous 29 

Ballets 18 

Conventions 4 

Meetings of Teachers' Institute 1 

School Graduations 7 

Special Rehearsals 1 

Total 129 



VETERANS' BUILDING 

The Veterans' Building each year has become more popular, 
not only to the Veteran organiz^ations but to the citizenry as 
well. The popularity of its auditorium speaks for itself. The 
record follows: 

Attendance: 

Auditorium (101 affairs) 50,500 

Meetings (total of 3,423) 171,150 

Daily in and out 45,750 

Total attendance 267,400 

Aware of the vast number of men and women in the armed 
forces of the United States, it is evident that the Veterans' 
Building, especially, will play a most important part in giving to 
the men and women who will return to us sick in mind and body, 
comfort and a place in which they may receive aid and support. 
The Trustees should exert every effort possible to keep the 
Veterans' Building a haven for these men and women. 

[13] 



ART MUSEUM 

The Art Museum, which occupies the fourth floor of the 
Veterans' Building and is under the directorship of Dr. Grace L. 
McCann Morley, has been one of the show places of San Fran- 
cisco. The programs and exhibits arranged for the enjoyment of 
the art loving people of San Francisco are of the finest and have 
received nation-wide acclaim. This section of the War Memorial 
has done much to entertain our men and women in the armed 
forces during their stay in San Francisco. 

The Art Museum attendance records show a daily in and out 
total for the year of 70,749, including approximately twenty 
service people in attendance daily. 



[U] 





AUDITORIUM — VETER.^NS BUILDINL 



[in 



REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

War Memorial of San Francisco 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Fiscal Year 1942-43 

OpcTd Veterans' Ai 

Total House Building Musi 

REVENUES 

Basic Rentals sS 32,460.08 $32,460.08 $ $ 

Percentages above basic 3,2^^8.85 3,298.85 

Rehearsals 200.00 200.00 

Of^ce Rentals 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Concessions 3,892.77 3,892.77 

Vending Machines 45.36 24.9? 20.41 

Service Charges 4,600.00 4,600.00 

Fixed Charges 113.40 113.4C 

Total Revenues $ 47,010.46 $42,276.65 $ 4,620.41 $ 1 13.4C 

EXPENDITURES 

Permanent Salaries $90,453.8) $35,051.11 $48,328.86 $7,073.84 

Temporary Salaries 7,016.85 2,799.98 3.741.00 475.87 

Wages 5,100.00 3,156.81 1,943.19 

Contractual Services 3,429.1 1 2,075.16 1,353.95 

Materials and Supplies 5,756.50 2,532.81 2,248.77 974.92 

Services of Other Depts 4,898.88 2,341.45 2,5 57.43 

Scavenger Services 440.28 220.14 220.14 

Aux. Fire Alarm Service 780.00 528.00 252.00 

Electricity and Gas 17,837.78 7,106.56 5,115.83 5,615.39: 

Reserve Fund Expenditures... 1,236.11 606.70 629.41 

Public Lia. Ins. Premium 1,600.00 1,000.00 486.60 113.401 

Total Expenditures $138,549.32 $57,418.72 $66,877.18 $14,253.42 

$124,295.90 

Expenditures Exceed Revenues $ 91,538.86 $15,142.07 $62,256.77 $14,140.02 

$ 77,398.84 

CONCLUSION 

I wish to express at this time, my hope and desire to see the 
Board of Trustees of the War Memorial, and all the associated 
organi2;ations which make up the War Memorial group, continue 
to prosper and flourish and carry on to greater achievement. To 
those who may follow in office, may they continue to build a 
more beautiful War Memorial for future ages to come. 

Sincerely, 
C. A. Marckley, Preside')] t. 

[16] 



APPENDIX 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 
MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 



Bond No. Name of Bonds Int. Rate 

62 1 2 Pacific Gas 5? Elec. Co 31/2% 

62 1 3 Pacific Gas &? Elec. Co Wl% 

586 California Water Service . . 4 % 

4280 California Water Service. . 4 % 

8715 Consumers' Power Company 3^% 

8716 Consumers' Power Company 3 J/2% 

1317 City of Vernon 4%% 

1318 City of Vernon 4%% 

1772 So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal. . 4 % 

Ills So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal.. 4 % 

8937* Calif. Toll Bridge Auth.. . . 4 % 

189 Emporium-Capwell Co. ... 4 % 

806 Emporium-Capwell Co. ... 4 % 

1319 City of Vernon 4%% 

7305 City of New York 31/2% 

1 1 1 City of New York 3!/2% 



Maturity Par Value 



6/1/66 

6/1/66 

5/1/61 

5/1/61 

11/1/67 

11/1/67 

10/1/44 

10/1/44 

4/1/50 

4/1/50 

9/1/76 

1/1/52 

1/1/52 

10/1/44 

5/1/54 

5/1/54 



$ 1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
750.00 
250.00 

$15,000.00 



*Called September 1, 1943. Replaced by: 
80701 Central Pacific Rwy. Co. . . 4 % 



8/1/49 $ 1,000.00 



[17] 



J 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



944 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



WAR MEMORIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January 11, J 945 



A 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Roger D. Lapham 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 



GuiDO J. MusTO, President 

Charles B. Kleupfer, Vice'President 

Sidney M. Ehrman 

Alvin Gerlack 

W. A. Henderson 

Dan S. Hewitt 

J. Bruce Jones* 

Walter A. Leonetti 

Felix S. McGinnis 

Harry A. Milton 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

'Confirmed May 29, 1944 vice C. A. Marckley, deceased 



War Memorial Staff 
Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director 
Ira G. Thompson, Secretary to the Board 



[3} 



San Francisco, California, 
January 11, 1945. 

To THE Honorable Roger D. Lapham, 

Mayor, City and County of San Francisco, 

AND TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE WaR 

Memorial of San Francisco. 

Gentlemen: 

The War Memorial of San Francisco has now completed its 
twelfth year of existence, and it aifords me great pleasure, as 
president of the Board, to render you a report of its activities 
during the year 1944. 

The War Memorial has continued to operate with the high- 
est standard of efficiency being evident, although this is becom- 
ing more and more difficult, due to the present conditions of 
lack of personnel, problems involving materials and supphes, 
and many other obstacles that are natural during war times. 

It has been a great honor and satisfaction to preside at the 
Board meetings, and at this time I wish to thank the Trustees 
for the confidence reposed in me as expressed by my election 
to the office of president of the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial. For those of you who wish to be informed more 
fully and in detail as to the creation and history of the War 
Memorial, I refer you to the past yearly reports of this Depart- 
ment. 

The War Memorial Department has enjoyed a most splendid 
growth during the past few years. The presentation of theatri- 
cal events in the Opera House has increased considerably. A 
greater number of the citi2,ens of San Francisco have had the 
opportunity to attend these events, presented by the world's 
greatest artists and produced in an Opera House that is without 

[5] 



question the most magnihcent municipally-owned Opera House 
in the world. The increased number of bookings also means more 
revenue to this Department. This, of course, is reflected in the 
tax rate of our City and tends to lighten the burden of our tax- 
payers. This is set forth more fully later on in this report. 

Our Board has been most ably assisted by our Managing 
Director, Mr. Edward Sharkey, who has at all times been most 
efficient and has exercised most careful judgment. His dealings 
with our tenants have always brcuight to us the highest com- 
mendation. 

He has been assisted in the administration of his office work 
by our Secretary, Mr. Ira G. Thompson, who has kept an 
accurate record of the operations of the War Memorial and 
its financial transactions. 

Mr. Daniel P. O'Sullivan, the office General Clerk-Stenog- 
rapher, has continued to be a valuable asset to our Department. 

The foremen of our various departmental functions have at 
all times carried out the tasks assigned them by the Managing 
Director in a most efficient manner. 

The Board as a whole has been a very pleasant one to work 
with, conservative, impartial and ever alert to adopt programs 
redounding to the best interests of the citizenry of San Fran- 
cisco and the efficient operation of the War Memorial. 

The Board has continued to act on each booking in the 
Opera House as the application for use of the building was pre- 
sented, taking into consideration every possible circumstance 
and deciding in the best interest of the people, rather than to 
attempt to adopt some policy that would bind or establish a 
precedent for future Boards. Heretofore it has been the general 
opinion of agencies contracting for musical entertainment, that 

[6] 



the Board of Trustees had a definite pohcy that would prevent 
the presentation of musical entertainments in the Opera House, 
although they were of the highest standard. This, of course, is 
not so. As explained above, the Board acts on the merits of each 
booking as presented for approval, and this policy has proven 
very satisfactory. 

WAR MEMORIAL TENANTS 

The relationship between the Musical Association of San 
Francisco (Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President), The 
American Legion War Memorial Commission (Mr. Charles 
Galhano, Chairman), the San Francisco Art Association (rep' 
resented by Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley, Director of the San 
Francisco Museum of Art) and the San Francisco Opera Asso- 
ciation (Mr. Kenneth Monteagle, President) has been most satis- 
factory, and each group is to be complimented for its splendid 
cooperation. 

One word concerning a beneficiary under the War Memorial 
Trust: The Musical Association of San Francisco, which is re- 
sponsible for all concerts given by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. It is a well-known fact that symphony orchestras 
are not self-sustaining, but must depend upon public subscrip- 
tions. This being the case, the Board of Trustees should render 
every assistance possible to the Musical Association. The Young 
People's Symphony concerts, given as they are on Saturday 
mornings, do not interfere with other bookings, and the Board 
of Trustees should continue their contribution to this most 
worthy cause by granting a rental concession. These concerts 
prepare and develop musical appreciation in our youth, who, 
in the future, will be the supporters of symphony music in our 
City. Furthermore, it should always be borne in mind that the 
Symphony Orchestra is the foundation of all musical culture in 

[7} 



our City; without it, the splendid performances of the San 
Francisco Opera Association, the concerts presented by the Art 
Commission of the City and County, or the briUiant ballet per' 
formances would be impossible. 

OPERA HOUSE 

The Opera House has enjoyed its most outstanding year, as 
indicated by the record of attendance, performances and other 
activities. It is interesting to note the increased number of per' 
formances in the Opera House over a period of years since its 
inception, as shown by the following table: 

(Oct.'Dec.) 1932 37 

1933 74 

1934 97 

1935 87 

1936 Ill 

1937 Ill 

1938 131 

1939 139 

1940 132 

1941 141 

1942 143 

1943 129 

1944 208 

(12/31/44: b(X3ked for 
period 1/1/45 to 6/30/45 69) 

VETERANS^ BUILDING 

The present war is affecting the activities of the 188 Vet' 
eran organi2,ations meeting regularly in the Veterans' Building. 
Their programs include the use of the facilities for service per' 
sonnel entertainment and for the accumulation and distribution 
of much'needed articles for members in the armed forces. The 
rc'instatement of the ''"Service Bureau" on a full-time basis, made 

[9] 



necessary by the demands of World War II Veterans, has in- 
creased the daily total of persons using this building. 

From the present outlook, it is very doubtful if the accom- 
modations now available will be adequate for the increased 
membership that will accrue as a result of the termination of 
the present conflict. Serious consideration should be given in 
advanced planning to meet the inevitable congestion without the 
requirement of excluding some Veteran organizations. 

Although the regular meetings are not attended as well as 
before the war, we find the present requirements are just about 
equal to our ability to meet them with the personnel now 
employed. 



ART MUSEUM 

Attendance statistics, though they do not give the whole 
picture, do serve as useful indices of museum use and growth 
in 1944 over the preceding year. 

In 1943, the dim-out still in force made necessary shutting 
off some galleries after dusk. Exhibitions and most activities were 
maintained, but the total of attendance suffered, and amounted 
to only 68,366, of which 20,901 was for specific educational 
activities. By contrast, with the dim-out lifted, 1944 showed an 
increase to 91,531 for general attendance, and to 35,759 for 
educational activities. 10,651 men and women in uniform visited 
the galleries in 1944, of whom 2,374 took part in activities 
opened to them on the same basis as to the Museum's own mem- 
bers. As usual, more than 110 exhibitions were presented on 
many aspects of contemporary art. Activities of many kinds, 
planned to aid the public in understanding and evaluating the 
art of to-day, and stressing the background of world knowledge, 

[10] 



of which art is a part, were carried on. The total attendance 
of more than 35,000 indicates their success. 

It should be noted that 1944 completed the Museum's tenth 
year in the Veterans' Building, and that total attendance during 
the period has totalled 1,279,651, for before the war annual 
attendance fluctuated between 125,000 and a high of 158,000, 
depending upon the exhibitions and activities. 

MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS 

The buildings are constantly inspected by our Managing 
Director. When improvements and/or repairs are necessary they 
are called to the attention of our Board at our meetings, or 
sooner if urgent. There are, or course, a multitude of improve' 
ments and repairs which would not be practical to recite here; 
however, I shall cite some of the more important repairs and 
improvements during the year 1944: 

Installation of a cross'indexing system and method of 
identification of signatures in the Opera House ''Guest 
Book"; 

Plaster repairs in the Veterans' Building and the Opera 
House; 

Improvement of the heating system in the Hospital 
Room, Opera House; 

Painting and regilding of the iron fence at the East end 
of the Memorial Court; 

Painting and refinishing dressing rooms, backstage in 
both the Opera House and the Veterans' Auditorium; 

Repairs to the brail curtain, stage of the Opera House; 

Overhaul and repair of Venetian blinds in the Veterans' 
Building; 

Miscellaneous painting and refinishing of various sec- 
tions of the Art Museum. 

[11] 



FINANCES 

I am of the opinion that it would be of interest to all to 
review the record of revenues accruing to the City and County 
of San Francisco due to the operation of the buildings of the 
War Memorial during the past years. Following is a table of 
receipts by fiscal years from 1932 to 1945, inclusive: 

1932-33 $24,846.75 

1933-34 33,124.59 

1934-3 5 41,689.84 

1935-36 38,075.82 

1936-37 42,081.30 

1937-38 45,804.28 

1938-39 40,313.87 

1939-40 48,970.10 

1940-41 50,862.74 

1941-42 45,959.72 

1942-43 47,010.07 

1943-44 66,348.15 

1944,4.- (Actual to Dec. 31 $^8,102. 27 

Est., bal. of year 24,662.87) 82,76^M4 



[l-^l 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
FISCAL YEAR 1943-44 







Opera 


Veterans ' 


Art 




Total 


House 


Building 


]\Iuseum 


Re\-EXUES : 










Basic Rentals 


$ 44,505.00 


$44,505.00 






Percent, above basic. 


9,254.36 


9,254.36 






Rehearsals 


70.00 


70.00 






Office Rentals 


2.400.00 


2,400.00 






Concessions 


5,43 3.97 


5,43 3.97 






Vending Machines . . 


59.82 


31.90 


$ 27.92 




Service Charges .... 


4,525.00 




4,525.00 




Fixed Charges 


100.00 






$ 100.00 


Total Revenues . . 


$ 66,348.15 


$61,695.23 


$ 4,552.92 


$ 100.00 


Expenditures: 










Permanent Salaries . 


$ 93,509.03 


$38,826.28 


$47,363.39 


$ 7,319.36 


Overtime 


6,611.75 


5,631.68 


920.56 


59.51 


Temporary Salaries . 


8,267.63 


4,192.80 


3,565.88 


508.95 


Wages 


5,643.00 


3,799.00 


1.844.00 




Contractual Services. 


2,624.04 


1,041.92 


1,582.12 




Heat, Light ^ Power 


18,984.27 


7,717.45 


5,312.39 


5,954.43 


Materials 6? SuppHes 


5,246.22 


2,825.99 


1,931.53 


488.70 


Pub. Lia. Ins. Prem. 


1,300.00 


780.00 


420.00 


100.00 


Services of Other 










Depts 


5,273.73 


2,872.34 


2,401.39 




Reserve Fund Expend. 










Scavenger Services . . 


440.28 


220.14 


220.14 




Aux. Fire Alarm Ser. 


780.00 


528.00 


252.00 




Equipment (Drapes) . 


166.12 


166.12 






Maint. ^ Rep., Other 










Equip 


1.163.08 


541.50 


621.58 




Total Expenditures 


$150,009.15 


$69,143.22 
$135, 


$66,434.98 
578.20 


$14,430.95 


Expenditures Exceed 










Revenues 


$ 83,661.00 


$ 7,447.99 


$61,882.06 


$14,330.95 








$ 69, 


330.05 





[in 



GIFT OF TAPESTRIES 

Gump's, 250 Post Street, San Francisco, California, very 
generously presented as gifts on December 28, 1944 two very 
rare tapestries from the Papal Looms, which were woven in 
1732 and 1736 by Gobelin weavers who were brought to Rome 
at the time. 

These were woven from the cartoons of Pietro Ferloni and 
are two scenes from Tasso's ''Jerusalem Delivered''. They are in 
size 12 feet by 18 feet and 12 feet by 15 feet. You will note that 
the printed pictures of these tapestries show cartouches in the 
above center border which quote the scene depicted from the 
poem. 

There are six other tapestries of the same set now hanging 
in the Metropolitan Museum in New York. One of these in 
the Museum is illustrated in the April 18, 1931 issue of Satur' 
day Evening Post on page 23. The two presented to us came 
from the New York sale of the property of Archduke Leopold 
of Austria. 

The Board accepted these gifts, recognizing and appreciating 
the high public spirit inspiring the donation. The tapestries will 
be appropriately hung in the corridors of the War Memorial 
Opera House for the pleasure and enjoyment of the patrons 
thereof. 



[17] 



CONCLUSION 

In closing, I wish to express my desire that the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial and all of the associated units 
which make up the War Memorial group will continue to pros' 
per and to go on to greater achievements. To my successor in 
office, I extend my sincere good wishes and pledge my full sup- 
port and continued cooperation. 

Sincerely, 

GUIDO J. MUSTO, 

President. 



APPENDIX 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 

Bond No. Name of Bonds Int. Rate Maturity Par Value 

6212 Pacific Gas e?' Elec. Co 3|/2% 6/1/66 $1,000.00 

6213 Pacific Gas ^ Elec. Co 3|/2% 6/1/66 1,000.00 

586 California Water Service.. 4 % Vl/61 1,000.00 

4280 California Water Service. . 4 % ?/l/61 1,000.00 

1772 So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal. . 4 % 4/1/50 1,000.00 

2278 So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal.. 4 % 4/1/50 1,000.00 

7305 City of New York 3^2% 5/1/54 750.00 

111 City of New York 3/2% 5/1/54 250.00 

80701 Central Pacific Rwy. Co. . . 4 % 8/1/49 1,000.00 

7407 No. Indiana Pub. Serv. Co. 3/8% 8/1/73 1,000.00 

7408 No. Indiana Pub. Serv. Co. 3^8% 8/1/73 1,000.00 

L'M3209 Pacific Gas ^ Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L'M3210 Pacific Gas Ss? Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L'M3211 Pacific Gas 6? Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L'M3212 Pacific Gas 6? Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L'M3213 Pacific Gas L^ Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

$15,000.00 

[19] 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1945 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



WAR MEMORIAL 



OF 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January JO, ]94() 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Roger D. Lapham 
Mayor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

\\^'\R Memorial of San Francisco 



Charles B. Kleupfer, President 

Felix S. McGinnis,* Vice'President 

Sidney M. Ehrman 

Alvin Gerlack 

D. Lyle Ghirardelli*** 

W. A. Henderson 

Dan S. Hewitt 

J. Bruce JoNEsf 

Walter A. Leonetti 

Harry A. Milton J 

guido j. musto 

Richard H. Newhall** 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

'Jelix S. McGinnis died March 17, 194?. successor not elected 

$Harry A. Milton died July 15. 1945 

tJ. Bruce Jones died December 23, 1945 

**Confirmed September 11. 1945 vice Harry A. Milton 

***Confirmed June 18, 1945 vice Fehx S. McGinnis 



War Memorial Staff 
Edward J. Sharkey, Managing Director 
Ira G. Thompson, Secretary to the Board 

[3] 



San Francisco, California, 
January 10, 1946. 

To THE Honorable Roger D. Lapham, 

Mayor, City and County of San Francisco, 

AND TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE WaR 

Memorial of San Francisco. 

Gentlemen: 

It affords me great pleasure, as president of the War Memorial 
Board of Trustees, to render to you a report of the activities 
during the year 1945. 

The War Memorial has continued to operate with the highest 
standard of efficiency being evident, although this is becoming 
more and more difficult due to problems involving materials and 
supplies, lack of personnel and other obstacles that are natural 
as an aftermath of the v^ar. 

It has been a great personal privilege and satisfaction to pre- 
side at Board meetings, and I do wish to thank the trustees for 
the splendid cooperation given to me during my term of office. 

The War Memorial has just completed its most successful 
year from the standpoint of activities and financial gain. The 
presentation of theatrical events in the Opera House and various 
other events in the Veterans' Building and the Art Museum 
have enjoyed a tremendous increase over and above other years. 
The 1945 opera season was the most splendid presentation to 
the citi2,ens of San Francisco and neighboring communities that 
has ever been produced. No other opera season, from the stand- 
point of attendance or glamor surpassed the season of 1945. 

The relationship between the American Legion War Memorial 
Commission, the Musical Association of San Francisco and the 
San Francisco Art Association has been satisfactory, and each 

in 



group is to be complimented for its splendid cooperation. It is 
well to note at this point that it was only through the coopera' 
tion and acquiescence of the above three beneficiaries under the 
trust upon which the operation of the War Memorial is predi' 
cated, that the United Nations Conference on International 
Organi2,ation could have been conducted in both of these build' 
ings. Too much credit cannot be given to the above named 
beneficiaries for their gracious acquiescense. 



UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON 
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 

After receiving official notification that San Francisco had 
been selected as the city within which the United Nations Con- 
ference on International Organi2;ation would meet, and having 
received a request from His Honor, the Mayor, that the War 
Memorial facilities be made available for this purpose, it became 
necessary to make vast preparations. Not knowing in detail what 
the Conference needs might be, it was difficult to visuali2,e the 
extent of the necessary preparations. As representatives of the 
United States State Department arrived, we gradually discovered 
that their requirements necessitated much construction, painting 
and many installations. To accomplish this, we were forced to 
require complete evacuation of the buildings by the regular ten- 
ants by April 1, 1945. 

The fourth floor of the Veterans' Building (the Art Museum 
quarters) was selected as the location for the clerical offices of 
the Secretariat of the Conference and to house the Army's 
world-wide broadcast headquarters. To properly accommodate 
these groups the galleries were sub-divided into many offices and 
departmental arrangements. The construction included partition- 
ing, electrical installations and supplementary illumination. The 

[7] 



completed re'arrangement housed approximately 600 employees 
who worked on around'the'clock schedules. 

The remainder of the Veterans' Building (1st, 2nd, 3rd floors 
and basement) was re'arranged by partitions, etc., to provide 
meeting halls for commissions and committees, offices for officials, 
offices for news agencies, offices for newsreel companies, council 
rooms for newspaper correspondents and reporters, facilities for 
broadcasting and housing of many other minor related activities. 
One of the rooms in the basement was set aside as a telephone 
exchange room, and a vast amount of installation and incidental 
work was done here to accommodate the almost unbelievable 
volume of telephone communication required. 

The Veterans' Building Auditorium was set for larger meet- 
ings of commissions and press conferences. A setting was built 
on the stage which ultimately formed the background for the 
signing of the Charter and Interim Agreement. The Green Room 
served, without alteration, as a lounging convenience to the 
delegates. 

The Opera House was selected for plenary sessions of the 
Conference and for meetings of the larger commissions. A stage 
setting was built and remained during the duration of the Con- 
ference. The basement promenade Vv^as equipped in eveiy detail 
for the purpose of furnishing meals to the delegations and to the 
personnel of the Secretariat. The me2,2,anine floor was furnished 
to provide a consultants lounge. The fourth floor offices in the 
front were re-furnished and provided a meeting place for the 
Conference Steering Committee. 

I have no doubt omitted some details vv^ith regards to the 
preparations, but be assured the task was laborious and taxed 
our personnel to its capacity; but despite this, everything was in 
readiness for the opening of the Conference on April 25, 1945. 



Operations during the Conference consisted of adequate 
janitation, augmented elevator service, building maintenance and 
the handhng of lost and found articles. Uncertainties of the 
activities made operation somevv^hat difficult. Meetings were 
called or cancelled without notice, requiring constant adjust- 
ments to cope with the needs. We served diligently throughout 
the entire Conference and have been rewarded by many pleasing 
verbal comments as well as numerous complimentary letters. 

The final session on June 26, 1945, found President Truman 
in attendance. During this day the United Nations Charter and 
the Interim Agreement were signed by the delegates of the fifty 
countries participating. We were able to obtain all of the sig- 
natures of these delegates for our Guest Book, which we pri2;e 
as an addition to the records of the War Memorial. 

The task of restoration was large. We found it advisable to 
re-paint offices in both buildings before allowing our regular 
tenants to return. Numerous damages to decorative plaster had 
to be repaired. Marble bases had to be reset and repaired. Office 
furniture had to be refinished. Carpets, drapes and upholstery 
had to be cleaned or repaired. We still have approximately 400 
chairs to be repaired and 72 oak benches to be refinished. 

The total expenditures of the War Memorial Department that 
can be charged directly to the Conference activities is estimated 
at approximately $15,400. This amount added to a loss of 
revenue of approximately $5,000 makes a cash contribution by 
this Department of approximately $20,400, in addition to the 
services and housing furnished. 

Enough credit cannot be given to the employees of the 
Department for the splendid spirit of cooperation that has made 
the machinery of operations run smoothly. Under the direction 
of Edward Sharkey, Managing Director, assisted by Ira Thomp- 

[11] 



son, Secretary to the Board and Daniel O'SuUivan, Clerk' 
Stenographer, the business of management has been effectively 
and efficiently conducted. Particularly I stress the manner in 
which service was given the United Nations Conference on 
International Organi2;ation. John F. McGuire, Head Janitor, 
was taxed to capacity along with his crew. In fact, all the 
employees of the Department, willingly and without comment, 
coped with the abnormal operating conditions and produced a 
well--organi2,ed group, each attending to his assignment with 
resulting efficiency. 

VETERANS^ BUILDING 

Because of the creation of new Veteran organi2,ations resulting 
from World War II, it is evident that the Veterans' Building 
has not sufficient facilities for these groups to have office space 
and meeting halls. 

A general plan is under way, sponsored by the various Vet' 
eran organi2,ations, which, in effect, will lead to a request for 
an additional building to the War Memorial to provide the 
facilities so sorely needed for these organizations. 

This plan, without question, should have the unanimous 
support of this Board of Trustees, as well as the general citi2,enry 
of San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

The San Francisco Museum of Art was able to maintain the 
pattern of its public services with constantly changing exhibitions 
of contemporary art and its sources, educational exhibitions and 
programs, and instructional and recreational activities explana' 
tory and related to the arts throughout the war period. With 

[13] 



the end of the war, normal operation has been resumed as 
rapidly as staff members in the services return and other pre 
fessionally trained personnel can be recruited. 

The Museum, Hke other tenants of the War Memorial, 
suffered the disruption of its program during the occupation of 
the Veterans' Building by the UNCIO, and suspended all its 
public work in the Building from March 28 through August 7, 
and did not operate again all galleries and full activities until 
October 23, when indispensable cleaning and sufficient temporary 
refurbishing of worn and damaged galleries could be completed. 
The complicated work of rearrangement and reorganization en' 
forced by the vacating of storerooms, shops and workrooms 
still continues and will for many months to come. The Museum 
is happy to report that despite the risks involved in handling 
rapidly art works and equipment worth nearly a million dollars 
at the tim.e of closing no great nor irreparable damage occurred. 

Because of the interruption of exhibitions from March to 
August (51/2 months) and the reduced operation until late 
October (an additional 21/2 months) the total number of ex' 
hibitions was only 57 for the year as against the normal 100 to 
130 annually. Attendance also for the year was only 68,557 
as against the normal peace time average of 125,000 to 150,000 
annually. It has been gratifying to note that there has been a 
fairly rapid return to the approximately 10,000 visitors a month 
the Museum counts as a normal minimum despite the fact that 
various uncertainties prevented many activities and the long 
range organization and scheduling of the spectacular and im- 
portant exhibitions normally presented at intervals. Interesting 
is the fact that an average of one in ten visitors wears a uniform, 
and all activities, opened to service personnel on the same basis 
as to Museum members, have had a 10 per cent to 25 per cent 
attendance of men and women in uniform. 

[in 



MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS 

Among the major improvements were: 

Indexing and numbering of all the signatures in the 
Opera House Guest Book tor reference and identification. 

Binding of Opera House programs tor the purpose of 
preserving, for all those interested, a history of the events 
that have taken place in the Opera House. 

Painting and re'gilding of the iron fences on the east and 
west ends of the Memorial Court. 

Repair of Venetian blinds in the Veterans' Building Club- 
room and Ladies' Lounge. 

Installation of an 'V)lio" curtain on the Opera House 
stage. 

Repair of all ''Rixson" hinges on the doors leading to the 
main auditorium of the Opera House. 

Installation of a modern 'Treon" type compressor in the 
drinking water cooling system of the Opera House and the 
Veterans' Building. 

Repair and revamping of the water lilter piping system, 
both buildings. 

Replacing of fire hose. Opera House and Veterans' 
Building. 

Repair of metal doors, both buildings. 

Alterations to Rooms IIS^ 126 and 127, Veterans' 
Building. 

Painting and refinishing of corridors and stairways, second 
and third floors of the Veterans' Building. 

A valuable acquisition to the furnishings of the Opera House 
was made through a gift by Mr. A. Livingston Gump of two 
''Gobelin" tapestries, depicting two scenes from Tasso's 
"Jerusalem Delivered" and woven in the years 1732 and 1736. 

[16] 



USE OF OPERA HOUSE— Calendar Year 1945 

Grand Opera performances 22 

Symphony Concerts 35 

Concerts, Opera Association Concert Division 7 

Concerts, California Concerts, Inc 20 

Ballet performances 36 

San Carlo Opera Co. performances 16 

Russian Opera and Ballet Association performances. ... 7 
Miscellaneous, including rehearsals 27 

Total 170 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles B. Kleupfer, 

President. 



[17} 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

FISCAL YEAR 1 944-4^- 

Opera Veterans' Art 

Total House Building Museum 

Revenues: 



Basic Rentals $ 65,345.00 $65,345.00 

Percent, above basic . . 18.617.00 18,617.00 

Rehearsals 410.00 410.00 

Office Rentals 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Concessions 7,700.80 7,700.80 

Vending Machines . . 137.25 58.07 $ 79.18 

Service Charges 3,407.98 3,392.32 $ 15.66 

Fixed Charges 100.00 100.00 

Miscellaneous 336.00 336.00 

Total Revenues .. $97,854.03 $93,930.87 $ 3,807.50 $ 115.66 

Expenditures: 

Permanent Salaries . . $ 92,907.99 

Overtime 8,379.35 

Temporary Salaries . . 8,870.58 

Wages 22,463.12 

Contractual Services . 4,281.38 

Heat, Light li Power 24,822.90 

Materials and Supplies 5,698.20 

Pub. Lia. Ins. Prem. . . 1,467.32 

Services, other depts. 5,695.17 

Reserve Fund Expend. 8,634.42 

Scavenger Services . . 440.28 

Aux. Fire Alarm Ser. 780.00 

Equipment 360.87 

ToT.AL Expenditures $184,801.58 

Expenditures Exceed 

Revenues $ 86,947.55 

Revenues Exceed 

Expenditures $ 5,927.74 



$34,759.02 


$49,678.47 


$ 8,470.50 


6,291.74 


2,034.33 


5 3.28 


4,95 5.52 


3,747.59 


167.47 


16,569.93 


5,893.19 




1,202.60 


3,078.78 




10,327.65 


6,632.27 


7,862.98 


2,779.32 


2,104.03 


814.85 


650.00 


717.32 


100.00 


2,887.93 


2,807.24 




6,650.85 


1,983.57 




220.14 


220.14 




528.0.') 


2^~2.f)0 




180.43 


180.44 




$88,003.13 


$79,329.37 


$17,469.08 


$167,332.50 






$75,521.87 


$17,353.42 



$ 69,594.13 



[18] 



APPENDIX 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 

Bond No. Name of Bonds Int. Rate Maturity Par Value 



6213 


Pacific Gas ^ Elec. Co 


3^4^f 


6/1/66 


1,000.00 


586 


California Water Service . . . 


4 '? 


5/1/61 


1,000.00 


4280 


California Water Service. . 


4 9r 


5/1/61 


1.000.00 


1772 


So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal.. 


4 7r 


4/1/50 


1,000.00 


2278 


So. Pacific'S. F. Terminal . . 


4 Vr 


4/1/50 


1,000.00 


7305 


City of New York 


^Vz^c 


5/1/54 


750.00 


111 


City of New York 


3!/2% 


5/1/54 


250.00 


80701 


Central Pacific Rwy. Co. . . 


4 % 


8/1/49 


1,000.00 


7407 


No. Indiana Pub. Scrv. Co. . 


^mc 


8/1/73 


1,000.00 


7408 


No. Indiana Pub. Serv. Co. . 


.3|/8% 


8/1/73 


1,000.00 


L'M3209 


Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 


3 % 


6/1/74 


1,000.00 


L'M3210 


Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 


3 % 


6/1/74 


1,000.00 


L'M3211 


Pacific Gas fe? Elec. Co 


3 % 


6/1/74 


1,000.00 


L'M3212 


Pacific Gas 6? Elec. Co 


3 7^ 


6/1/74 


1,000.00 


L'M3213 


Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 


3 9r 


6/1/74 


1,000.00 




$15,000.00 



[19} 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PRESIDENT'S 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1946 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WAR MEMORIAL 

OF 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 9, 1947 



G63441 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Roger D. Lapiiam 
Mavor 



Board of Trustees 

OF THE 

War Memorial of San Francisco 



GuiDO J. MusTO, President 

Walter A. Leonetti, Vice President 

Sidney M. Ehrman 

Frank A. Flynn* 

Alvin Gerlack 

D. Lyle Ghirardelli 

Wilber a. Henderson 

Daniel S. Hewitt 

Charles B. Kleupfer 

Richard H. Newhall 

Ralph J. A. Stern 

^Confirmed July 10, 1946 vice E. Lawrence George, resigned 



War Memorial Staff 

Edward J. Sharkey. Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George. Secretary to the Board 



San Francisco, California 
January 9, 1947 
To the Honorable Roger D. Lapham 
Mayor, City and County of San Francisco 
and to the Board of Trustees of the War 
Memorial of San Francisco 
Gentlemen: 

It may be well for us all to realize that our beautiful 
and useful War Memorial has been of service to the people 
of San Francisco for fourteen years. 

To you, Honorable Mayor Lapham, I tender my sincere 
thanks for my reappr)intment as one of the Board of 
Trustees and to you my fellow Board Members for your 
kindness in electing me President of the Board for the 
year of 1946. 

In the past two years, rentals of the Opera House have 
increased to almost three times the number of rentals 
during the first six years. 

As an aftermath of World A\'ar II many new units of 
Veterans' organizations have been created. This condition 
resulting in the A'eterans' Building now being operated to 
its utmost capacity practically every night of the month. 

Obviously with the increased use of all of the facilities 
of the W^ar Memorial, it has created many additional op- 
erating problems primarily due to the relatively small 
staff of both management and other employees that are 
in the employ of the War ]^Iemorial Department. Unlike 
practically every other city department, the Managing Di- 
rector does not have an immediate assistant which, of 
course, in view of the fact that his responsibilities are not 
only for the maintenance and up-keep of the buildings but 
likewise, he is responsible for bookings and for operation 
of the Opera House during the presentation of any per- 
formances. This, of course, places upon the Managing 
Director a great deal more burden than that which right- 
fully should be his. 

In an effort to relieve the tremendous amount of work 

[5] 



now resting both upon the ]\Tanaging- Director and the 
Secretary of the Board, it is my recommendation that 
there be created at least one additional employment; 
namely, that of General Clerk-Stenographer in the Exec- 
utive Office of the War Memorial. This at least will tend 
to relieve our managing staff of some of the detailed work 
w^hich properly should be carried by others. 

We have the good fortune of a competent Managing 
Director in the personage of Mr. Edward Sharkey. Much 
praise has been accorded to Mr. Sharkey in many of the 
reports made by the retiring chairmen in the past six 
years and one realizes more and more his value by working 
with him through the years. 

Mr. E. Lawrence George has been appointed as Secre- 
tary to the Board succeeding Mr. Ira Thompson who re- 
signed the position to accept an appointment in another 
city department. 

Mr. George's work is very satisfactory and there is no 
question that he will be able to continue the high standards 
set for the particular duties of the Secretary. 

Mr. Daniel O'Sullivan has taken a leave of absence to 
enter the employ of another city department and his place 
has been capably filled in temporary employment by Miss 
Ruth Rieve. 

The War Memorial Department has enjoyed a most 
splendid growth during the past six years and the present- 
ation of theatrical programs, as previously noted, has in- 
creased considerably. During the recent Grand Opera sea- 
son twenty-seven performances of Grand Opera were 
presented and enjoyed by the people of San Francisco and 
also many visitors from out of the city. 

The War Memorial buildings are now operating in a 
normal manner after having been the home of the United 
Nations during their recent Conference in San Francisco. 
We who are serving on the Board are fully cognizant of 
our responsibilities as Trustees of this great War I\Iem- 
orial which was erected and dedicated to the memory of 

[7] 



those veterans of our city who died while serving with 
the armed forces of these United States in past wars. The 
members of the Board have discharged their duties intelH- 
gently and with sincerity. At times there has been some 
dififerences of opinion but at all times the differences and 
suggestions have been constructive. 

It is my desire at this time, to extend my personal thanks 
as well as the thanks of the Board of Trustees, to the 
American Legion War Memorial Commission that have 
to do with the operation of the Veterans' Building for 
their most splendid cooperation as well as financial contri- 
butions during the past year. It has been a genuine pleasure 
to have worked with this fine body of veteran representa- 
tives. 

THE VETERANS' BUILDING 

The first three floors of the Veterans' Building are oc- 
cupied and used by veteran and patriotic organizations. 
In the facilities, there is an Auditorium with a seating cap- 
acity of eleven hundred. The ofiices on the first floor of the 
Veterans' Building are occupied and used by the head- 
quarters of the various veterans' groups and on the second 
floor, in addition to the meeting halls, there is a Club room 
and Women's Cocktail Lounge. Located on the second 
floor parallel to Van Ness Avenue is the beautiful Green 
Room which is handsomely furnished and used as a library, 
reading and lounging room. 

Over two hundred veteran and patriotic organizations 
hold their meetings regularly in the Veterans' Building. 
They include the American Legion, The Disabled Ameri- 
can Veterans of the World W^ar, The Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, The Sons of the American Legion, The Gold Star 
Mothers, The Daughters of the American Revolution, 
The Forty & Eight, The Eight and Forty, The Military 
Order of the Purple Heart and The United Spanish War 
Veterans and many other well known veteran organiza- 
tions. During the past year approximately two hundred 
performances and attractions of various kinds were given 

[9] 



in the Auditorium. They consisted of lectures, concerts, 
dances and other miscellaneous events. The Veterans' 
Building is now operating all of its facilities to the utmost 
capacity and it is very evident that an additional building 
will have to be made available because of the increase of 
veteran organizations and also because of the increase in 
their many types of activities. The number of people using 
the Veterans' Building during the past years has been 
estimated at over six hundred thousand. This, of course, 
is pointing to the fact that there is a considerable amount 
of wear and tear of facilities and of the building which 
brings about many problems of up-keep and replacement. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

This institution occupies the fourth floor of the Veterans' 
Building. It is operated as a Museum of the San Fran- 
cisco Art Association under the Directorship of Dr. Grace 
L. Morley. It has become one of the most active art mu- 
seums in this section of the state. Many types of exhibi- 
tions were held during the last year. They included paint- 
ings, prints, sculpture, photographs and other forms of 
the allied arts. Many thousands of people availed them- 
selves to the use of the Aluseum by visiting it during the 
past year. 

There has been provided in the current budget the sum 
of $110,000 for the i)urp()se of renovating and making 
many other additic ns and needed structural changes in 
the Art Museum section. This will, of course, make the 
facilities a great deal mc^re convenient for use by the 
general public. 

The rentals of the Opera House have increased tremen- 
dously during the past six years. It is well to note that at 
the beginning, the Opera House was used approximately 
only 30 times which was increased over a period of several 
years to approximately 110 or 120 times a year. The 
rentals have increased during the past six years to over 
three hundred presentations. The Opera House is one of 
the most magnificent of its kind in the world and its stan- 

[ 11 1 



dard of maintenance and operation is of the very highest. 
It is estimated that during the past year there was an ag- 
gregate attendance of about five hundred thousand people. 

Many of the leading artists of the music w^orld were 
presented for the enjoyment of the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The usual splendid season of symphony was given by 
the Musical Association of San Francisco. The Symphony 
under the capable conductorship of Pierre Monteux pre- 
sented its usual unexcelled Symphony. 
PERSONNEL OF THE BOARD 

At the end of 1946 the terms of three members of the 
Board expired. They were Mr, Walter Leonetti, Mr. Alvin 
Gerlack, and Mr. Frank Flynn. All had carried out their 
duties during the past years conscientiously and well. Mr. 
Flynn had served only five months. He had been appointed 
to an unexpired portion of a term. The retiring members 
believed that it might be well to afford an opportunity to 
other veterans to serve on the Board and indicated that 
this was their wish. It was felt, however, because of the 
short time served by Mr. Flynn, he should have an oppor- 
tunity to complete a full term. Because of the above action, 
two new trustees were appointed. They were as follows : 
Mr. Ben Baggenstos, Mr. Milton Kletter, and Mr. Flynn. 
OPERA HOUSE BOOKINGS 

DURING THE PAST YEAR 

Grand Opera Performances 27 

Symphony Concerts 87 

Concerts, Opera Association Concert Division 28 

Concerts, California Concerts - Larry Allen 21 

Ballet Performances 41 

San Carlos Opera Company Performances 27 

Russian Opera & Ballet Performances 6 

Miscellaneous, including rehearsals 101 

The Board of Trustees has recently adopted a policy 
against the use of the Opera House in the future for con- 
vention purposes. 

[ 13 1 



It is well that everyone is conversant of the reasons for 
the adoption of this policy. As most everyone knows, the 
Opera House was erected under the terms of a trust for 
certain specific purposes. These purposes are set forth in 
the trust as being mainly for the presentation of symphony 
concerts, ballets, operas and other musical and theatrical 
presentations. Many of the people of San Francisco con- 
tributed their own personal funds which go to make up 
this trust for the purposes set forth and there most cer- 
tainly is a moral as well as legal responsibility resting 
upon the War Memorial Board of Trustees to see that the 
War Memorial is used for the purposes enumerated in 
the trust as well as to carry out the intent of the people 
who contributed such large sums of money. It is very ol)- 
vious that the furnishings and other appointments of the 
Opera House preclude the practicability of permitting 
conventions to be held there. 

As a matter of fact, it is quite evident, because of the 
substantial damage that has been caused to the Opera 
House during recent conventions held there, that one of 
two things must be done. Either the Opera House shall be 
used for the purpose for which it was erected or it shall be 
permitted to be used as a convention hall and would in a 
short period of time certainly lose its identity as an out- 
standing and beautiful edifice. 

It is a well established fact and one which can be readily 
ascertained by a visit to auditoriums or halls where con- 
ventions are generally held that, of course, there is a 
tremendous amount of wear and tear upon the building 
and its furnishings when used for convention purposes. 

Marble slabs and tables have been damaged, a great 
amount of gold leaf work scratched ofif of the walls and 
moldings, nails and tacks have been driven into ornamental 
plaster work, ornamental plaster moldings have been brok- 
en and a great amount of other damage has been caused. 
It is only necessary to point out at this time that it is 
fully impractical to attempt to operate and maintain the 

[ 151 



opera House in the manner in which the people expect it 
to be maintained; namely as that of a beautiful Opera 
House for the i)resentatii)n of theatrical ])r()j^Tams and on 
the other hand, to permit the use of the Opera House for 
purposes that generally tend toward the above stated 
type of damage. It is impossible to repair the damage to 
the ornamental plaster work in i)atches. Either the entire 
surface is done over or the result is a very unsightly view 
because the effect is of various colorings on the walls 
where the damage is done. 

The adoption of this ])olicy, contrary to statements or 
opinions of people who are interested in the use of the 
Opera House for the purposes other than that which the 
Opera House was erected, obviously will not materially 
effect the bringing to San P^-ancisco many conventions or 
visitors. It is well to point out at this time that the Opera 
House has a relatively small seating capacity as com])ared 
to the Civic Auditorium. A check of the past record will 
show that only a few conventions have used the Opera 
House during the past years. It is far better that the Opera 
House be used for the i)urposes for which it was intended 
and maintained as a place of beauty and an inspiration 
than it be used a couple of times a year for convention 
purposes to the detriment of the building and of the i)eople 
who desire that it be a show^ place. 

As everyone knows, the Civic Auditorium and its gen- 
eral furnishings are the type of furnishings w^hich are used 
throughout the United States in convention halls. They 
are of a type that permit a considerable amount of wear 
and tear that is prevalent during a convention and are 
certainly not the luxurious type that is installed and main- 
tained in the 0])era House. Moreover, by the utilizing of 
the adjacent halls of the Civic Auditorium, there would be 
very little need or use of the War Memorial Opera House 
or Veterans' Building. VVe suggest that those interested 
attempt to establish a program for the utilizing of the 

[ 16 1 



Auditorium and its attendant halls for convention pur- 
poses. 

Of course, the members of the Board of Trustees, being 
citizens of the City and County of San Francisco are just 
as much interested in bringing visitors and conventions to 
San Francisco as any other individual or group of indi- 
viduals but their primary responsibility is to carry out the 
terms of a trust and to assure that the use of the Opera 
House will in no manner detract from its beautiful appear- 
ance or from its luxurious furnishings and this cannot be 
done if conventions are to use the Opera House, as much 
as the Board regrets to take this action. 

The Veterans' Building is operating to its utmost cap- 
acity and many complaints have been made by the tenants 
of the Veterans' Building because of the use of certain 
rooms of that building for convention purposes. Because 
of the compactness of the building and its surroundings, 
unquestionably conventions do interfere with practical 
operations of those whose offices are on the first floor as 
well as on other floors of the building. They are constantly 
interrupted by strangers who are not acquainted with the 
building walking in and out of the offices during the day 
looking for committees and subcommittees. The use of 
the elevators and other facilities around the building while 
a convention is being held only adds to the confusion and 
interferes with the permanent tenants. 

The use of the meeting halls is practically out of the 
question because of the fact that it is impossible to proper- 
ly clean these rooms and the adjoining surrounding area 
in order to have them ready for meetings held by veteran 
organizations during the evening. Most certainly these 
rooms and the surrounding area should be properly cleaned 
for the veteran meetings. Irregardless of the different 
opinions of those that are not charged with the operation of 
the building, it is very clearly set forth that the use of the 
Veterans' Building should be by and for the Veterans or- 
ganizations. 

[17] 



The veterans groups would like to give what assistance 
they can to bring conventions to the city but as it has been 
])reviously pointed out, it certainly does not stop bringing 
conventions to San Francisco by limiting the use of the 
War Memorial because the records show that relatively 
few con\-entions are held there. There are several halls 
within the area of the Civic Center that can be used for 
comentions and other ])iir])oscs l)Ut again it may be more 
])ractical as stated before to utilize the full facilities of the 
Civic Auditorium. The \'eterans' Building should not be 
turned into a convention hall. 

Enumerable requests have been made from time to time 
during the past years by various veterans' groups that the 
rooms be thrown open for meeting ])urposes during the 
day. These rc(|uests ha\'e become more numerous due to 
the fact that more veteran and ])atri()tic organizations 
have come into existence since World War II. These re- 
f|uests have been turned down. Needless to say, the opera- 
tion of the building in this manner can only be at an addi- 
tional cost of thousands of dollars a year to the taxpayers 
and most certainly this could not be considered of any 
material advar.tage. 11ie use of the l)uilding for other pur- 
])oses during the day cannot be ])ermitted when the veter- 
ans are denied day time use. 

The ty])e of furnishings in these meeting halls will not 
])ermit the usual hard wear and tear that is the result of 
con\-ention use and there is no questior, that the intent of 
the people should be carried out and that is that the Vet- 
erans' Building should be kept and maintained for veteran 
use. However, it is ])ossil)le to permit the use of the Audi- 
torimn in the Veterans' Building for commercial purposes 
whenever there is no use of it made by the veteran groups. 

MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS 

Lacquering c)i floors of the offices of the first floor of 
Veterans' Building. 

Installation of Velour covered ropes for standee control 
in the Opera House. 

[18 1 



Binding of Opera House programs covering all the pre- 
sentations up to date with provisions for future binding. 

Completion of indexing the signature book in Opera 
House. 

Repair of copper coping over stage and roof of Opera 
House. 

Repair of oak l^enches due to damage caused by United 
Nations occupancy. 

Installation of flood lights in Memorial Court between 
the two buildings in order to provide adequate lighting 
for persons passing to and from the Court. 

Painting and refinishing South Corridor back stage of 
Opera House. 

Repairing and refinishing of elevator shafts and cars 
of Veterans' Building and Opera House. 

Repainting of Room 21}), Veterans' Building. 

Scaling and repainting of Opera House skylight. 

Repair and reconditioning of all Venetian blinds of all 
the meeting rooms on second floor of Veterans' Building. 

Repairing and refinishing certain sections of the Art 
Museum. 

Repair of miscellaneous furniture in Opera House and 
Veterans' Building. 

Recovering of all awmings on both buildings. 

Installation of signs above all offices on first floor A'et- 
erans' Building. 

Overhauling of water tanks of the fire pressure system 
in both buildings. 

FINANCES 

It would be of interest to all to review the record of 
revenues accrued to the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco due to the operations of the War Memorial Buildings 

[19] 



during the past years. Following is a table of receipts from 
1932 to 1946 inclusive: 

1932 -33 $ 24,846.75 

1933-34 33,124.59 

1934-35 41,689.84 

1935-36 38,075.82 

1936-37 42,081.30 

1937-38 45,804.28 

1938-39 40,313.87 

1939-40 48,970.10 

1940-41 50,862.74 

1941-42 ......... 45,959.72 

1942-43 47,010.07 

1943-44 66,348.15 

1944-45 97,854.03 

1945-46 78,666.54 



Respectfully submitted, 

GUiDO J. :musto 

President 



20 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
FISCAL YEAR 1945-46 

Opera Veterans' Art 

REVENUES Total House Building Museum 

Basic Rentals $56,455.00 $56,455.00 

Percent, Above Basic .. 11,133.63 11,133.63 

Rehearsals 750.00 750.00 

Office Rentals 3,333.34 3,333.34 

Concessions 3,649.34 3,649.34 

Vending Machines 46.32 28.92 $ 17.40 

Service Charges 2,640.00 2,640.00 

Fixed Charges 100.00 $ 100.00 

Miscellaneous 558.91 558.91 

Total Revenues $78,666.54 $75,350.23 $ 3,216.31 $ 100.00 



EXPENDITURES 

Permanent Salaries $98,179.98 $40,173.96 $47,925.56 $10,080.46 

Overtime 6,584.15 5,483.16 1,022.35 78.64 

Temporary Salaries .... 5,703.26 3,718.57 1,844.63 140.06 

Wages 22,015.58 17,145.87 4,869.71 

Contractual Services .... 4,929.00 2,078.81 2,850.19 

Heat, Light & Power.... 21,761.87 9,218.86 6,196.14 6,346.87 

Material & Supplies .... 5,507.88 3,071.12 1,751.08 685.68 

Pub. Lia. Ins. Prem 1,648.00 824.00 724.00 100.00 

Services, Other Dept. .. 4,858.86 2,130.10 2,728.76 

Reserve Fund Expend... 15,054.66 2,475.15 12,579.51 

Scavenger Services 506.28 253.14 253.14 

Aux. Fire Alarm Ser 780.00 528.00 252.00 

Equipment 266.77 81.38 81.39 104.00 

Total Expenditures $187,796.29 $87,182.12 $83,078.46 $17,535.71 

$170,260.58 
Expenditures Exceed 

Revenues $109,129.75 $11,831.89 $79,812.15 $17,435.71 

[21 1 



APPENDIX 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 
MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP TRUST BOND HOLDINGS 

Bond No. Name of Bonds Int. Rate Maturity Par Value 

1772 So. Pacific - S. F. Terminal.. 4 'r 4/1/50 1,000.00 

2278 So. Pacific - S. F. Terminal.. 4 % 4/1/50 1,000.00 

7305 City of New York V/2% 5/1/54 750.00 

111 City of New York 3>4% 5/1/54 250.00 

80701 Central Pacific Rwy. Co 4 7r 8/1/49 1,000.00 

7407 No. Indiana Pub. Serv. Co... V/^'/c 8/1/73 1,000.00 

7408 No. Indiana Pub. Serv. Co... V/^r'c 8/1/73 1,000.00 

L-M3209 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3 ^f 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L-M3210 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L-M3211 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L-M3212 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

L-M3213 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 3 % 6/1/74 1,000.00 

TM26-024 Southwestern Tel. Co 2y^f/c 10/1/85 1,000.00 

TM26-025 Southwestern Tel. Co 2>^% 10/1/85 1,000.00 

TM26-026 Southwestern Tel. Co 2;ki% 10/1/85 1,000.00 

TM26-027 Southwestern Tel. Co 2^% 10/1/85 1,000.00 

$15,000.00 



i2^G^ 



7jj^ 



i.^ 



22 



m 



■■!l 






w 



■.A I 



* ' ', 

:| 



'iii'